June 25, 2018, 7:33 pm
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.06901 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.02912 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03401 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.5072 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02524 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03345 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03758 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.57159 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03155 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00712 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 32.90079 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01879 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02526 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1289 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07111 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01879 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.28053 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.19402 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 376.17437 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03754 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02493 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01856 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 11.99061 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12218 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 54.75385 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 10.57591 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01879 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.77772 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.41526 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.33615 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12016 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.92728 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.1963 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25225 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33484 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.51146 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01612 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03918 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01416 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01417 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08979 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.87956 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 169.07178 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14072 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 3.87599 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14741 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.44878 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.11882 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.24803 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 5.23224 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 264.43067 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06764 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.27568 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 22.24728 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 798.38407 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 2.03119 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.45509 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01333 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.06417 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 1.89121 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.28183 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 76.00526 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 7.92522 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 16.91094 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 20.86622 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00568 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01541 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.38595 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 158.00451 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 28.292 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 2.98572 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 2.74709 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25254 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05728 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01166 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02548 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1786 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.3177 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.98891 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 25.98647 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 45.97896 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15183 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 6.67042 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.65295 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.29256 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 13.4053 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.37584 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07518 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25239 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.72679 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.59207 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15205 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.03401 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02719 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00723 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01879 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06134 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0609 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.28222 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06966 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 106.55769 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06839 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07509 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.18236 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 15.96073 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07046 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1479 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25235 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33738 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16635 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02551 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01417 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.41725 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 149.94363 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 10.72905 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 394.98309 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16441 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 9.67644 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25202 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.61856 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04882 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04333 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08786 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12682 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.56924 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 42.63435 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.49267 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 72.51597 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01879 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.59451 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 147.50094 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 1499.4363 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 430.10147 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.07159 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0488 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 10.56614 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05073 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 10.56614 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 1.92165 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.69466 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25241 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 97.51033 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 6.80008 Zimbabwe dollar

Bonifacio versus Mindanao pirates

THAT’S the Philippine warship “BRP Andres Bonifacio” safeguarding the maritime Rizalian Republic from rapacious Moorish criminals infesting the southern waters. In fact, last Yuletide, this Filipino frigate was expected by Defense Secretary Delfin Lorenzana to patrol Sulu waters and help other naval units in curbing kidnapping and piracy in the country’s southern border.

Lorenzana: “This ship will certainly be a valuable platform in the pursuit of the constitutional mandate of the Armed Forces of the Philippines, this will strengthen the Philippine Navy capabilities in raising the country’s security concerns, in the protection of our territorial integrity and maritime interest.” [Philippines News Agency, “BRP Andres Bonifacio to help rid Sulu waters of piracy, kidnapping threats,” 11 Dec 2016]

A crime-free Sulu Sea. Add that to your Christmas wish list. Defense Secretary Lorenzana had also said: “The acquisition of this sea platform will help propel the PN Sail Plan 2020...Our maritime territory is 20 times bigger than our land mass so it is just right that we go into a program to upgrade our Navy.” The Hamilton-class cutter is supposed to have a cruising range of 14,000 miles and a sea-and-loiter time of 45 days. [Philippines News Agency, “Arrival of BRP Andres Bonifacio, a symbol of PHL commitment to modernize its military,” 09 Dec 2016]

The BRP Andres Bonifacio (the third Gregorio del Pilar-class frigate to be commissioned by the Philippine Navy) had also flown the Flag further south in this year’s tropical summer. The seacraft’s participation in the Langkawi International Maritime and Aerospace Exhibition ‘17 and the maritime exercises at the Royal Malaysian Naval base in Lumut, Perak is a manifestation of the Philippine Navy’s “commitment to promote harmonious relations between and among countries,” according to Commodore Albert A. Mogol [Philippines News Agency, “BRP Andres Bonifacio’s Kuala Lumpur visit highlights PHL-Malaysia partnership,” 03 April 2017]

The Filipino frigate is named after the Pangulo of the Republika ng Haringbayang Katagalugan. Gat Andres (who was captioned the “titulado (Presidente) de la Republica Tagala” in the February 8, 1897 edition of “La Ilustration Espana y America,” a Spanish periodical) ought to be recognized as the country’s first president, according to a Manila City Council resolution circa November 2013. Bonifacio founded the first national government of the Philippines and served as its president from August 24, 1896 until his murder on May 10, 1897, according to Councilman John Marvin “Yul Servo” Nieto, citing historians Milagros C. Guerrero, Emmanuel Encarnacion and Ramon N. Villegas. Bonifacio, moreover, had been declared by the Manila city council as the true father of the Filipino nation and founder of Philippine democracy. [McClatchy-Tribune Business News, Washington, 30 November 2013]

Just like the national capital, the Pampanga city of San Fernando had honored President Bonifacio, with Police Chief Inspector Andrea Bonifacio, reportedly a direct descendant of the hero, declaring, “What is important is how can we show our love for the motherland.” [Philippines News Agency, 30 November 2015]

Back in Manila, a legitimate progeny, Attorney Gregorio “Gary” Bonifacio, great-grandson of Procopio (a brother of President Andres B.) had told citizens gathered for the wreath-laying ceremony at the Bonifacio Shrine: “The Bonifacio family is thankful to the entire Filipino nation in commemorating the 152nd birthday of Gat Andres Bonifacio, but more than this event, we must accept his challenge to enrich our motherland by applying and embracing his spirit and aspirations for the country.”

“Voters should bring back the politics that is based on principles and dignity, as practiced by the Katipunan leaders.” [“Bring back ‘principled’ politics – Bonifacio kin,” TCA Regional News, Chicago, 01 Dec 2015]

Another descendant (and namesake), Andres Bonifacio, had run for the post of barangay councilman in Valenzuela City, garnering 2,000 votes, with a no-nonsense platform of environmental protection and an anti-crime advocacy. [Philippines News Agency, 05 November 2010]

President Bonifacio’s original platform was the Katipunan Kartilya, a code of ethics and a clarion call for self-actualization. “For Bonifacio’s Katipunan, self-determination began at home, with the family, whose apparatus of reason and enlightenment did not need to understand the politics of sovereign nations or the inter-state system of global capitalism in order to see clearly that a promise had been broken, and that no state of colonial exception could explain or legitimate the brutalisation of people by an intolerable exercise of sovereignty.” [“The blood compact: international law and the state of exception in the 1896 Filipino revolution and the US takeover of the Philippines,” Postcolonial Studies, Vol. 7, No. 1, 2004, pp. 27–48]

Bonifacio (“the other great leader of 19th-century Philippine anti-colonial resistance,” according to David Haekwon Kim, “Empire’s entrails and the imperial geography of ‘Amerasia’,” City: analysis of urban trends, culture, theory, policy, action, 8:1, April 2004, p. 70) is honored today (30 November 2017) with a Philippine national holiday. But Bonifacio had always been highly regarded by non-Filipino Austronesians in the BIMP-EAGA portion of Asean.

“Tan Melaka put both the ‘national hero’ Jose Rizal and the ‘Father of the Philippine Revolution’ Andres Bonifacio into his Garden of Humanity, and upheld their names on the peak of one garden called ‘Greater Indonesia’ to emphasize the significance of their thoughts. Interestingly, Tan Melaka classified Jose Rizal and Andres Bonifacio as ‘pure Indonesians.’ According to Ramon Guillermo’s analysis, this shows that Tan Melaka saw Malaya, Indonesia and the Philippines as one nation based on the same race.” [Ngoi Guat Peng (translated by TEO Jia Jia and SHOW Ying Xin), “Editorial introduction: the pluralistic thoughts and imagined boundaries in Nusantara,” Inter-Asia Cultural Studies, 18:3, 2017, pp. 313-316]

Bonifacio’s legacy is shared by Filipinos with their Indonesian siblings. “Andres Bonifacio, a young working class from Tondo, served as a propagandist and organizer for the Liga Filipina formed by Rizal before Rizal was deported to Dapitan in 1896. His favourite books were Eugene Sue’s ‘Wandering Jew’ and the ‘Ruins of Palmyra.’ He preferred El Filibusterismo to Noli and loved to talk about the French Revolution. As a grown man, Andres Bonifacio had read numerous ‘protest literature’ to inspire him for the revolution.” [Ubonrat Siriyuvasak, “People’s media and communication rights in Indonesia and the Philippines,” Inter-Asia Cultural Studies, 6:2, 2005, pp. 245-263]
Bonifacio lives; smash Han hegemonism, Moorish criminality.
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