April 22, 2018, 1:25 am
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.07053 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 1.99923 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03418 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.38677 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02467 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03418 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03841 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.59228 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03034 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00724 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 33.62742 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0192 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02503 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13175 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06526 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0192 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.26032 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.18403 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 384.48243 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03837 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02421 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01858 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 11.41406 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12052 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 52.12791 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 10.7778 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0192 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.71039 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.39282 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.39601 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.11551 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.94891 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.1798 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24262 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33916 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.52276 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01551 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03865 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01348 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01349 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08525 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.89975 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 172.80584 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14089 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 3.95007 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15072 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.45249 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.11491 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.24505 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 4.8093 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 264.60534 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06739 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.26727 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 22.73862 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 806.60649 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 1.91031 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.37565 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01361 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.06171 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 1.92145 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.32194 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 76.97331 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 7.61206 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 17.28442 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 20.40042 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00575 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01575 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.25043 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 158.93989 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 28.9034 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 2.99693 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 2.50451 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.22892 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05855 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01192 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02543 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17577 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.31452 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.94968 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 25.52333 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 45.86134 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15521 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 6.76013 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.64144 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.29902 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 13.70175 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.35007 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07459 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.22915 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.87536 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.59554 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14884 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.01652 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02629 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00739 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0192 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06176 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06241 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.21836 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06459 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 106.04187 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0699 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07223 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.16816 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 16.22066 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07202 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14768 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25792 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.34667 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.161 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02513 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01349 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.42646 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 146.53351 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 10.79316 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 380.06338 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16804 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 9.89015 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.22917 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.599 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04602 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04292 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07736 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12961 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.56365 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 43.7488 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.50259 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 70.84694 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0192 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.54158 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 154.65719 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 1139.831 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 437.43038 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.00538 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04922 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 10.16881 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05185 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 10.16881 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 1.83983 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.79931 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.2292 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 99.66391 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 6.95026 Zimbabwe dollar

Battling fake news about mining

OVER the last few months, traditional news and social media have been filled with news reports and commentary on fake news or false news and how it has impacted so many publics worldwide. It has helped that in the United States there has been consistent focus on allegations that Russian socmed experts have somehow influenced the voting public in a way that helped elect Donald Trump in an upset victory over erstwhile “shoo-in” Hillary Clinton. The investigation in the US somehow opened a can of worms — or was it Pandora’s Box? — leading to the discovery of a similar effort to influence the Brexit vote in the United Kingdom, the influence of a company called Cambridge Analytica, and, most recently, apparent links of an arm of this operation into efforts to influence the Philippine elections in 2016.

As a friend lamented recently, “I thought the advent of social media would strengthen democracy and its institutions, but I now have to admit I was wrong.” Indeed what appears to have become the effect of social media on democracy is the very situation that the Founding Fathers of the US Constitution wished to avoid - the apparent descent of politics to the lowest common denominator, and the degeneration of political discourse from studied debates to demagoguery. Come to think of it even Plato himself seemed to have warned of the “evils” of mass participation in governance.

But that sounds so “elitist” and I figure there is no way we can govern anyway else.

Unless one governs the way one-party states govern, with an Orwellian hand and rigid controls. But North Korea excepted, I can’t imagine how you can really keep the outside world out in this day and age. Something eventually has to give.

But social media has done as much damage as it has good in today’s day and age when it comes to the need for intelligent discourse. I can already imagine an objection here — Who is to say what intelligent discourse is? In my case all I am simply referring to are instances where facts as stated by experts fly in the face of public opinion that continues to hold on to biases and even myths, because of the way cognitive dissonance kicks in when we are confronted with data that contradicts our personal opinions.

Take the case of mining and widespread environmental destruction.

To many of the millennial generation, the mining industry is the perfect whipping boy when environmental degradation is being discussed. It helps that broadcasters on radio and Tv have access to footages of Irresponsible practices of some miners, and these are broadcast for millions to see, over and over again. It helps too that over the years miners never had a reason to spend on advertising and talk about their CSR projects - long before even the phrase “corporate social responsibility” was even coined. You see, because mining areas are usually so remote, it came naturally to Responsible mining operations to build roads, schools, hospitals and communities where they operated - and they have been doing so since the 1900s when Baguio was the mining capital of the Philippines.

But they never told us because companies only advertise if they need us - the general public — to buy their products. So miners kept silent about the good that they were doing. And when bad eggs among them acted irresponsibly and were exposed, it was that image that sunk in.

Recently I listened to a presentation by the Regional Director of the Mines and Geosciences Bureau in Davao, Engr. Constancio Paye Jr., before Davao students. He shared a number of slides about the industry and what the potential was, how an operation starts and what it has to go through to get permits and all, and then he shared a slide that reminded me of the misinformation that abounds.

According to RD Paye, a total of some 2.5% of the total Philippine land mass is covered by mining permits. Of this, some 0.3% is active mining production while 2.2% or so is in the exploration stage.

Think about that- only 0.2% of the Philippines is actively being mined — yet the general storyline being shared by anti mining advocates is that mining is the principal reason for the destruction of our environment!

It’s not. The principal reason for the widespread destruction of our environment is population growth and urbanization. But of course we don’t want to blame ourselves do we?

And so because this narrative has become the accepted story about mining, communities that could otherwise benefit from Responsible mining operations are denied the opportunity because students in cities everywhere sign petitions to stop mining - even if 1) they’ve never seen a Responsible mining operation before; 2) they live lifestyles that constantly depend on the products of mining and 3) they can never give up the comforts of life brought about by mining ( cemented roads and buildings and houses, cellphones and cars and jeeps and planes, almost any technological invention that you use from birth to death etc) even though they boast that they can live without mining but not without food.

As if that was a valid choice.

But, like mining, social media is here to stay. So like the activists who feel they have to fight and defend democracy under the new conditions brought by Social media, so should we who work for or believe in responsible mining operations accept social media for what it is and learn to do battle in a similar way, fighting disinformation with facts and outright lies with simple truths.

And we just have to persevere, because if we let fake news win, we will let progress come to a halt.
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