June 25, 2018, 9:50 am
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.06901 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.02912 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03401 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.5072 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02524 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03345 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03758 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.57159 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03155 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00712 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 32.90079 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01879 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02526 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1289 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07111 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01879 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.28053 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.19402 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 376.17437 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03754 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02493 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01856 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 11.99061 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12218 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 54.75385 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 10.57591 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01879 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.77772 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.41526 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.33615 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12016 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.92728 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.1963 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25225 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33484 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.51146 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01612 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03918 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01416 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01417 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08979 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.87956 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 169.07178 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14072 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 3.87599 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14741 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.44878 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.11882 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.24803 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 5.23224 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 264.43067 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06764 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.27568 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 22.24728 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 798.38407 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 2.03119 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.45509 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01333 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.06417 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 1.89121 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.28183 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 76.00526 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 7.92522 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 16.91094 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 20.86622 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00568 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01541 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.38595 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 158.00451 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 28.292 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 2.98572 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 2.74709 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25254 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05728 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01166 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02548 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1786 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.3177 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.98891 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 25.98647 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 45.97896 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15183 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 6.67042 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.65295 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.29256 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 13.4053 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.37584 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07518 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25239 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.72679 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.59207 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15205 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.03401 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02719 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00723 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01879 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06134 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0609 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.28222 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06966 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 106.55769 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06839 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07509 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.18236 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 15.96073 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07046 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1479 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25235 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33738 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16635 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02551 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01417 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.41725 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 149.94363 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 10.72905 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 394.98309 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16441 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 9.67644 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25202 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.61856 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04882 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04333 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08786 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12682 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.56924 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 42.63435 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.49267 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 72.51597 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01879 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.59451 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 147.50094 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 1499.4363 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 430.10147 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.07159 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0488 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 10.56614 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05073 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 10.56614 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 1.92165 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.69466 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25241 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 97.51033 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 6.80008 Zimbabwe dollar

Bad science and bad people

Common themes are central to the damage control campaign currently conducted in connection with the criminal negligence accusations surrounding the mass vaccination of vulnerable young children with Dengvaxia. The statements of paid hacks, conflicted physicians, politicians as well as legitimate opinion-makers, medical practitioners and government officials appear within hours of each other and employ strangely similar verbiage, betraying both authorship and origins.

The first exonerates Sanofi Pasteur when they declared last November 29, 2017 that Dengvaxia could lead to severe outcomes in seronegative inoculated children. The virtual get-out-of-jail card says the belated announcement was due to “recent” and “new” trials.

The second also exonerates Sanofi Pasteur by declaring the tests undertaken on Dengvaxia valid and correct.

The third spin labels frightened families as hysterical and driven into a state of “vaccine distrust” or aversion. They appeal not simply for cold sobriety but for “shutting up”. 

Let us get to the truth.

In July 27, 2015, two years and three months prior to Sanofi Pasteur’s announcement of “recent” tests, requisite trials used for Dengvaxia’s licensing had already cautioned that “subsequent first wild-type infection (which is typically less severe) may have occurred in a vaccination-induced immunologic setting, which is more analogous to a secondary infection (which is associated with an increased risk of severe disease)”.

This simply means that the risk of a severe disease after a less severe infection induced by vaccination may occur. This is validated in the study’s footnotes: “On the risk of severe dengue during secondary infection: a systematic review coupled with mathematical modeling.”

In September 2015, these findings were reiterated and published in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) under “‘The Efficacy and Long-Term Safety of a Dengue Vaccine in Regions of Endemic Disease” (page 1204). Both show alarms raised as early as Dengvaxia’s licensing.

Subsequently, sirens were sounded seven other times prior to Sanofi Pasteur’s belated admission.

On January 25, 2016, almost two years before the Sanofi Pasteur announcement, the Philippine Formulary Executive Council (FEC) issued strict conditionalities requiring the small-scale and phased distribution of Dengvaxia. The bases were “on the available scientific evidence presented to the Council.” Again, nothing recent, nothing new.

On March 2016 the World Health Organization (WHO) declared that Dengvaxia “may be ineffective or may even increase that risk in those who are seronegative at the time of first vaccination.” The WHO would sound the alarm a second time. On July 2016, it reconfirmed that Dengvaxia “may act as a silent natural infection that primes seronegative vaccinees to experience a secondary-like infection upon their first exposure to dengue virus.”

These echo alarms sounded in July 27, 2015.

On September, 2016, one year and two months before Sanofi Pasteur’s announcement the Medical Research Council Center for Outbreak Analysis and Modeling (MRCC) at the Imperial College of London (ICL) also raised the alarm on Dengvaxi. Their rationale was consistent with dangers cited in July 27, 2015. “Unlike most diseases, the second time you get dengue, it’s much more likely to be severe than the first time you get it.”

On October, 2016, still over one full year before Sanofi Pasteur admitted to its dangerous effects, the Singapore Health Sciences Authority (SHSA) flagged Dengvaxia, declaring “there is a postulated risk of severe dengue in those who do not have past dengue infections when they become infected.”

Postulates turn to reality when the first child dies. On November, 2016 the DOH was ordered to review the case of Christine Mae de Guzman, a fifth grader, who died after being vaccinated with Dengvaxia. She was seronegative. 

Between March 18 and August 20, 2016, 30 children were considered severely afflicted based on the “hospitalization measure” used in the licensing study. Unfortunately, such criteria fails to count those afflicted without hospitalization and those who die without seeing a doctor – a critical reality in third world countries.

The most disturbing is a post-mortem analysis of Dengvaxia’s original tests. 

On November 23, 2017, in the Journal of Clinical Epidemiology (JCE) a critical analysis of the original July 27, 2015 study was published. It was entitled a “Review of a licensed dengue vaccine: inappropriate subgroup analyses and selective reporting may cause harm in mass vaccination programs.” 

Res ipsa loquitur. The study refers to the harm caused by Dengvaxia by name and identifies significant and substantive flaws that cast doubt on the very credibility of Dengvaxia’s license. It identifies the severe, dangerous and possibly fatal effects on seronegative children by a “vaccine-induced immunologic setting” as Anti-body Dependent Enhancement (ADE).

It was ADE the WHO warned against early in 2016. It was also ADE the MRCC in London warned against. The same that SHSA in Singapore raised the alarm on. It was ADE specifically described on page 1204 and footnoted in the original licensing trials for Dengvaxia in 2015.

Neither “recent” nor “new”, the JCE-published analysis says the 2015 tests failed to point out “signals of harm” of severe dengue fever in children younger than nine years, and questions the very basis for a threshold of nine. While the risk of an occurrence of severe dengue in the overall study group was 5.5, in children younger than nine, the relative risk was higher at 8.5. Do the math. Numbers lie when they are selective.

The analysis exposes substantive design flaws in Dengvaxia’s licensing trials. One, only a sub-group analysis was conducted in 2015. Two, and here we quote verbatim, there was a deliberate “selective reporting and inappropriate subgroup claims (which) mask the potential harm of dengue mass vaccination programs” where informed consent was not secured prior to inoculation.

What fear and vaccine distrust now permeate are not caused by open debate, nor by righteous indignation. Distrust is caused by the criminal negligence of trusted companies, the lies of public officials and the conflicts of interest of trusted physicians who continue to lie to vulnerable families who placed the lives of their innocent children in their hands.
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