October 18, 2017, 3:31 pm
Facebook iconTwitter iconYouTube iconGoogle+ icon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0717 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.20871 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03475 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33813 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0248 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03475 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03905 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.57731 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03233 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00736 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 33.79539 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01952 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02637 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13393 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0616 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01952 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.2666 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.19953 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 390.86294 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.039 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02447 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01905 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 12.09684 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12863 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 57.20812 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 11.07243 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01952 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.82351 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.42558 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.46544 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12309 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.92112 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.21712 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25865 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.3441 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.52519 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01653 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0399 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01467 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01471 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08578 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.91761 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 173.50644 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14337 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 3.9752 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15244 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.45638 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12402 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.19621 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 5.08551 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 263.17844 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0682 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.26328 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 22.78407 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 667.88363 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 2.04705 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.48653 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01381 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.1829 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 2.01386 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.33715 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 78.73877 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 8.09352 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 17.57126 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 21.9875 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00589 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01601 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.51054 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 161.47403 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 29.39672 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 2.99785 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 2.29988 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25908 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05952 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01212 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02662 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.18372 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33809 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.01269 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 26.59117 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 47.89145 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.157 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 7.04803 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.65892 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.3034 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 13.98223 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.37125 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0823 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25884 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.89184 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.59176 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15391 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.0285 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02714 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00751 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01952 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06338 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06228 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.05076 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07005 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 109.88871 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07106 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07576 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.11582 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 16.21398 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07321 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15248 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26667 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13003 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15841 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02638 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01468 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.43354 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 148.77001 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 10.91371 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 405.15812 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17083 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 10.05428 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25884 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.64526 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04826 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04364 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07093 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13039 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.58821 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 43.69387 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.51738 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 71.10504 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01952 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.57321 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 156.77469 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.19475 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 443.49862 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.03026 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0495 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 10.83639 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05271 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 10.75752 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 1.96193 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.87895 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.259 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 101.31784 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 7.0656 Zimbabwe dollar

America losing its soft power in Asia (2)

SOME of these phrases were repeated and embellished in the Asean-Plus Three (China, Japan, and South Korea), the East Asean Summit and the Asean Regional Forum meeting statements. But these are all chairman’s statements of Asean-Plus meetings and not a consensus joint statement by Asean members alone.

Southeast Asia analyst Michael Vatikiotos called the framework agreement a quid pro quo, “the de-escalation [by Asean] in exchange for a not satisfactory for many people but nonetheless a framework.” 

Jay Batongbacal, a Philippine analyst, attributed the agreement on the framework “to a combination of the Asean’s inability to come to clear consensus, China’s perceived power, fear of economic consequences, failure of the US to give strong credible guarantees, and individual leadership perceptions.”

Some critics said an ambiguous and thin framework means China can drag out the COC negotiations and also say “see, we’ve been negotiating with you.” More worrying, China appeared to set conditions for negotiations on a COC, including non-interference by “outside parties” meaning the US.

Although the US, Japan and Australia did not get the result that they wanted in the Asean communique, they doubled down with their own ministers’ statement.

The ministers underscored the importance of upholding the rules-based order. They voiced their strong opposition “to coercive unilateral actions that could alter the status quo and increase tensions.” 

They also urged “SCS claimants to refrain from land reclamation, construction of outposts, militarization of disputed 
features, and undertaking unilateral actions that cause permanent physical change to the marine environment in areas pending delimitation”.

Further, the ministers called on all claimants to make and clarify their maritime claims in accordance with the international law of the sea as reflected in the 1982 United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS) and to resolve disputes peacefully in accordance with international law. 

The ministers also “urged Asean member states and China to ensure that the COC be finalized in a timely manner, and that it be legally binding, meaningful, effective, and consistent with international law.”

But in the most controversial portion of their statement, they called on “China and the Philippines to abide by the Arbitral Tribunal’s 2016 Award in the Philippines-China arbitration, as it is final and legally binding on both parties.” This was much stronger wording than Asean, and
China, preferred. Indeed, Philippines Foreign Minister Alan Cayetano said in apparent response, “We appreciate not being told what to do.”

Cambodia and the Philippines generally supported China’s preferences while the rest of Asean was largely non-committal. Obviously, Asean was split on the South China Sea, much to China’s advantage and much to the US’ chagrin. 

Asia analyst Bonnie Glaser said, “With Asean itself divided and China’s sway over individual Asean members growing, this is an unsurprising even if disappointing development”.

The prognosis for non-interference by the US in the COC negotiation process is not good. Proposed legislation — the Asia Reassurance Initiative Act — would “strengthen US security commitments to […] allies and build partner capacity in the Asia-Pacific region to deter aggression [and] project power.” 

This will be done by increasing the US military presence in the Asia-Pacific, including regular freedom-of-navigation and over-flight operations in the East and South China Seas, and greater assistance helping allies and partners build more capable maritime forces. 

Furthermore, Washington will help establish “new regional security partnerships” and develop a greater relationship with Taiwan.

Expanding the military capabilities of allies and partners, and an increased US presence and the promotion of stronger regional security relationships, will not ease tensions between China and the US and its allies. Moreover, a more aggressive US posture and presence could force regional nations to choose between the two. The US may not like the outcome.

Making matters worse, China President Xi Jinping seems to have now publicly declared a red line in the South China Sea. During his speech commemorating the 90th anniversary of the People’s Liberation Army, he vowed that China “will never allow any people, organization or political party to split any part of Chinese territory out of the country at any time, in any form.”

If the outcome of these Asean meetings were the only concern, it could and probably should be dismissed as a blip in the US-Asean relationship. But it comes against a broad background of US soft power setbacks in the region.

The relative decline in US soft power accelerated when the Trump administration withdrew from the US proposed Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP) economic pact. Then Trump seemed to be willing to make a deal with China — if China helped restrain North Korea, the US would lessen pressure on China in the South China Sea. 

To Asean nations, Trump’s “America First” mantra is beginning to feel to allies, friends and their enemies more like “you are on your own.”

Also eroding trust and confidence in the US, the Philippines under new President Rodrigo Roa Duterte moved toward a more neutral stance between China and the US. Despite the 65-year-old US-Philippines Mutual Defense Treaty, the Philippines was not sure the US would back it militarily in a conflict with China.

Indeed, Duterte criticized America for pushing the Philippines to raise the arbitral tribunal ruling with China when it did not send troops to help protect its islands in the South China Sea from Beijing reclamation activities. The Philippines is increasingly reluctant to allow the US to use its territory to “deter” China or to jointly exercise with it in the South China Sea. 

US allies Australia, Japan and the Philippines have so far declined US requests to join its freedom of navigation operations against China’s claims.

Even Indonesia expressed disapproval over US “power projection” in the South China Sea. US relations with Thailand have not been close since the military coup there in 2014 and it seems to be leaning towards China. The same with Malaysia since the US took a legal interest in Prime Minister Najib Razak’s international financial dealings.

“Asean leaders are increasingly unlikely to take risks with China, including challenging China’s activities in the disputed areas, ” according to Bill Hayton of Chatham House. This loss of confidence clearly erodes US soft power and weakens Asean’s bargaining position vis-à-vis China.

In sum, the US is discovering the hard way that its soft power relationships in Southeast Asia are shallower and more ephemeral than it thought. The Trump administration needs to urgently enhance its soft power commitments in the region if it hopes to stem or even keep pace with China’s growing influence.

***

Quote of the Day – “In our age, there is no such thing as keeping out of politics. All issues are political issues.” – Anon
Rating: 
No votes yet

Column of the Day

Radiation in Hiroshima and Nagasaki

By PHILIP S. CHUA | October 18,2017
‘Frequent handwashing and not touching the face (and those surfaces) are essential habits that significantly lower the risk of acquiring these infections.’

Opinion of the Day

Don’t forget the 604 kilos of shabu

By ELLEN TORDESILLAS | October 18, 2017
‘The 604 kilos of shabu passed through Customs without inspection because someone influential sponsored it.’