January 19, 2017, 8:07 am
Facebook iconTwitter iconYouTube iconGoogle+ icon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07373 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.57378 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03554 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.31799 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02683 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03594 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04015 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.59024 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03683 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00756 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 33.69343 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02008 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02866 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13752 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06466 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02008 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.3697 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.21257 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 401.92732 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03975 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02636 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02027 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 13.25216 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13857 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 59.08452 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 10.94158 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02008 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.08352 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.51054 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.5802 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14047 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.93074 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.20173 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.29553 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.37844 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.45091 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01889 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04186 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01668 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01668 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08489 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.88376 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 186.70949 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15123 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 4.106 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15569 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.45774 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14162 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.28749 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 5.79984 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 267.35595 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07659 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.3682 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 23.7101 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 649.86949 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 2.28267 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.57599 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01421 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.28719 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 2.08292 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.39468 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 80.11845 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 9.27525 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 18.06866 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 23.72214 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00613 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01646 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.68681 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 163.9229 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 30.21682 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 3.01144 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 1.82694 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.27103 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06121 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01246 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02868 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.20159 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.40323 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.15559 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 27.06284 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 49.94981 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16036 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 7.12387 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.72014 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.30797 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 14.38807 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.43213 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08957 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.27209 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.32403 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.58975 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17069 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.1843 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02826 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00773 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02008 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06745 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06333 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.10359 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08276 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 116.05701 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0731 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08481 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.19264 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 16.31379 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07528 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15698 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26272 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12864 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17904 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02867 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01668 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.44581 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 146.29592 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 10.96165 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 462.93516 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17511 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 10.33889 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.27216 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.7113 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04658 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04632 Tonga Pa'ang
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07556 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1345 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.63521 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 44.48906 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.5529 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 72.37502 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02008 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.57519 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 64.9468 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.20026 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 453.06163 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.15479 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05167 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 12.38747 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05421 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 12.49508 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 2.24312 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 5.01706 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.27219 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 104.1859 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 7.26561 Zimbabwe dollar

AIDS in our midst

NO one in government seems able to help check the rapid spread of AIDS that has posted 29 new cases of infections daily, as the Dept of Health stands helplessly by. It has documented 82% of new AIDS patients from teenagers as ‘’men having sex with men’’.

No one seems daring enough to “crash” the LGBT community and try to be a voice of restraint against sexual intimacies among “men”. Unlike forbidden live-in heterosexual relationships which can be stumped in the face of any legal or civil case, same-sex live-in partners are not subject to any civil, legal or even religious constraints. Commonly frowned upon third sex relations have been practically endorsed by big-time personalities in the entertainment broadcast and print media. The AIDS awareness campaign of both government and zealous NGOs has apparently been overcome by the more exciting and irresistible themes of homosexual romance, drama and sex on TV and the internet. The cinemas, especially Filipino indies, have not lacked for various themes on homosexual life. The blockbuster Hollywood movie “Brokeback Mountain” seemed to have opened the floodgates for local same-sex production. TV action and drama series are replete with third sex relationships such as “Arrow” and “ Supergirl”. The award-winning MIFF movie “Die Beautiful” portrays what has been the common lifestyles of talented and physically well-endowed gays. They also go through unusually major hearbreaks in life: rejection by their families especially by utterly harsh fathers and material exploitation by endless male partners. But, interestingly, the movie does not deal even partially with the AIDS outbreak. Certainly, this columnist is not inclined to view homosexuality in an unfavorable light but the downside of unrestricted sexual relations among males producing the highest incidents ever of AIDS in our country should give us pause. 

Many of today’s youth have virtually plunged into homosexual relationships without as much care in the world. The new year opened with a staggering account - 82% of AIDS patients belong to ages 15 to 24.

What else can explain the deterioration of youthful behavior from the former afflicted age of 30 to 40 yrs victimized by the globally-dreaded disease but the breakdown of many poor and middle-class families and the exposure of the youth through the decadence and materialistic entertainment media. The youthful restlessness has fed on the sexual exuberance from the almost open physical inhibitions and intimacies from both sexes. Private and public universities should now more than ever feel challenged to rise above their academic curriculum to instill a deeper and spiritual outlook on life instead of demanding patent levels of so-called excellence and achievements from the students. Will it help if safe sex among same sexes be taught instead of school authorities turning the perennial blind eye to the covert homosexual behavior practically in all college campuses in our country? 

Senator Panfilo Lacson could have echoed what should have been a part of President Duterte’s New Year’s message. But no, the latter would rather open the year with his unremorseful diligence to virtually pursue more extra judicial killings through the brutal drug war which has become an international concern. Lacson is proposing that government provide compensation for families of innocent victims of extrajudicial killings. We can correctly surmise that Duterte who has refused to condole with the still grieving families has been burdened with the guilt inside him. He has exhibited the characteristic defensive mechanism of someone who had something to do with those suddenly turning into widows and orphans as the fate decreed by vigilantes or by his blood-thirsty police operatives. In some ways, Lacson is suggesting that Malacañang initiate a healing process that should have taken place during the Christmas season and indeed should be part of the government’s obligation - and compassion - to all victims of social wretchedness and injustice. Presidential spokesperson Ernesto Abella said the Lacson proposal would be taken up in the next Cabinet meeting. 

Very few people include healing as part of their new year resolutions. Many want life to just go on despite the physical and emotional brokenness they continue to endure How about taking time out to be part of the healing and preaching event of the international Christian evangelist and healer Heidi Baker this weekend (January 7 & 8) at the Cuneta Astrodome in Pasay. Her healing crusades for over ten years included remarkable divine healings from terminal illnesses and disabilities in Europe, the United States, South America and Africa. These also included reportedly twenty people being raised from the dead.

Her aggressive and unorthodox style that made her controversial among some Protestant and Born-Again communities has nonetheless brought hundreds of thousands to Jesus Christ. 
Rating: 
Average: 3 (2 votes)
Twitter icon
Facebook icon
Google icon
LinkedIn icon
Pinterest icon
Reddit icon
Yahoo! icon
e-mail icon

Column of the Day

Superbug kills woman

By PHILIP S. CHUA | January 19,2017
154 View(s) 0 Comment(s)
‘It is scary to imagine a world with a pandemic of superbugs, without effective antibiotics. People will be dying like flies.’

Opinion of the Day

Duterte’s passion to help the poor

By NESTOR MATA | January 19, 2017
185 View(s) 0 Comment(s)
‘President Duterte prefers more funds to feed the hungry poor rather than to rehabilitate drug addicts.’