May 30, 2017, 8:53 pm
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.07364 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.41007 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03564 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.31981 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.027 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03589 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0401 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.6166 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03506 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00754 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 34.21095 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02005 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02781 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13836 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06529 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02005 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.29236 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.20493 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 401.44376 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04006 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02702 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01963 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 13.52517 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13741 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 58.34771 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 11.64428 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02005 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.98697 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.47778 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.56126 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13403 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.93884 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.17475 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.28187 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.36094 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.46049 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01801 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04182 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01561 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01565 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0872 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.90034 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 181.17105 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14734 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 4.06477 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15626 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.47034 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13286 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.33467 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 5.54381 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 267.31502 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07139 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.29406 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 23.68157 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 650.67176 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 1.99739 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.59535 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01422 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.22292 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 2.06637 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.36342 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 81.33948 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 9.02567 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 18.04692 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 22.52055 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00608 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01644 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.22579 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 164.42751 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 30.1925 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 3.06196 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 1.8448 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25807 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06113 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01244 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02794 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.19633 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.36344 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.10347 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 27.33106 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 48.04492 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16094 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 7.17866 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.6938 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.308 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 14.38981 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.37146 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08585 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26102 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.43674 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.59984 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16929 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.06136 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02844 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00772 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02005 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06582 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06346 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.09846 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07534 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 112.05735 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07301 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08223 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.13242 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 16.43433 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07519 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15815 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.2679 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13354 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17503 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02781 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01561 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.44528 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 150.39102 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 10.96852 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 441.47785 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1749 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 10.32645 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26048 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.68398 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04812 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04614 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07172 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13474 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.60567 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 44.71626 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.52777 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 72.08743 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02005 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.56748 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 76.19812 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.20001 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 455.96552 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.1526 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05162 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 11.80971 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05414 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 11.85342 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 2.13836 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 5.01103 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26116 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 104.06056 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 7.25687 Zimbabwe dollar

‘Pragmatic relationship’

THE Chinese state media called it the likely beginning of a “pragmatic relationship”.

Following are excerpts of a Reuters report on the summit meeting between Chinese President Xi Jinping and US President Donald Trump in Florida last week:

“State-run Chinese tabloid Global Times said the meeting ‘served as an indicator that the China-US relationship is still very much on course since the Trump administration took office in January’, and it was likely the two nations would develop a more ‘pragmatic relationship’.

“It seems that both countries have understood the importance of how essential a smooth transition needs to be, and not just for the two countries involved here, but really for the entire world over.”

Reuters also reported that “in the talks, Trump pressed Xi to do more to curb North Korea’s nuclear program and the two agreed to a 100-day plan for trade talks aimed at boosting US exports and reducing the gaping US trade deficit with Beijing”.

It would appear the two sides chose to keep their two-day meeting as limited in scope as possible by not dwelling on other issues like the Syrian crisis and the South China Sea (SCS) territorial disputes.

Ergo, it looks like we have to wait another day to find out how Xi and Trump will deal with the conflicting territorial claims in the SCS.

RUSSIA-US TIES

The expected personal rapport between Russian President Vladimir Putin and US President Donald Trump that was supposed to spark better relations between their countries may not come to pass after all.

During his run for the presidency, Trump waxed confident about being able to work closely with Putin who expressed the same sentiment. There were even reports that Russia engaged in activities that supposedly helped Trump win the election.

However, after the US rained some cruise missiles on the Shayrat military air base inside Syria that reportedly killed some 86 people including civilians and children, those relations may become shaky once again. 

The US bombing was in retaliation for a poison gas attack allegedly perpetrated by the Syrian government of Bashar al-Assad that killed at least 70 people in Syrian rebel-held territory.

Russia is allied to the Assad government in the latter’s fight against the Syrian rebels. The US, on the other hand, supports the rebels who want Assad out. Both, however, are against the Islamic State.

The Shayrat air base is home to Russian special forces and military helicopters. There were no reports of Russian casualties because the US reportedly gave advance notice to the Kremlin of the attacks.

Russia warned of “extremely serious” consequences on account of the US missile attack.

“We strongly condemn the illegitimate actions by the US. The consequences of this for regional and international stability could be extremely serious,” Russia’s deputy UN envoy, Vladimir Safronkov, told a meeting of the U.N. Security Council.

At the same time, Russian Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev said that the US missile attack was one step away from clashing with Russia’s military.

It would be most unfortunate if this incident resulted to a further deterioration, instead of the anticipated improvement, of Russia-US relations with the election of Trump.

THE CHURCH AND DIGONG

In a rather surprising development, the Catholic Bishops Conference of the Philippines (CBCP) president Archbishop Socrates Villegas said that Catholic bishops are now ready to explore ways of collaborating with the Duterte administration in battling the drug menace.

This is indeed a most welcome development. The bishops have hitherto been critical of the war against illegal drugs being waged by President Rodrigo Roa Duterte aka Digong.

Presidential spokesman Ernesto Abella noted Socrates’ statement that the Catholic Church “is not against the President” and that “it is not the business of the Church to be leading political upheavals”.

 “We thus look forward to their help in treating drug dependents and restoring their mental, spiritual, and psycho-emotional health,” Abella said.

INQUIRER AND ABS-CBN

I may have missed it but I have not come across any reaction from the owners of the Philippine Daily Inquirer and the ABS-CBN to Digong’s serious accusations against them. 

I find that rather curious.

According to Digong, the owner of the Inquirer who also owns the popular Dunkin’ Donuts chain, was allegedly involved in tax irregularity.

“Inquirer ang may-ari ng Dunkin’ Donuts, alam mo ba iyan? At may utang iyan silang taxes. Inayos ni Kim Henares (former BIR head), walang binayad. Kung may binayad, kaunti lang,” he said.

The Inquirer owner reportedly owed the government P1.56 billion in taxes.

On the other hand, Digong accused ABS-CBN of not airing a TV campaign ad during the last presidential election which was paid for.

“Alam mo iyang p… i… ABS-CBN na iyan, tinanggap nila ang pera ko, they never showed… and hanggang ngayon, wala man lang offer to reimburse or to return the money,” he said.

Earlier, Digong accused the Inquirer and ABS-CBN of unfair and biased reportage on his administration. Both denied the accusation.

***

Today is the 351st day of the tenth year of Jonas Burgos’ enforced disappearance.

The family and friends of Jonas hope that the Duterte administration will not be part of the continuing cover-up. The Burgos family implores Digong to haul the perpetrators to justice and bring Jonas back home even with the appointment of Gen. Eduardo Ano as AFP chief who was implicated in the abduction of Jonas almost ten years ago.

***

From an internet friend:

Pregnancy and Women: 

Frequently Asked Questions 

Q: Should I have a baby after 35?
A: No, 35 children is enough.

Q: I’m two months pregnant now, when will my baby move?
A: With any luck, right after he finishes college.

Q: What is the most reliable method to determine baby’s sex?
A: Childbirth.

Q: My wife is five months pregnant and so moody that sometimes she’s borderline irrational.
A: So what’s your question?

Q: My childbirth instructor says it’s not pain I’ll feel during labor, but pressure. Is she right?
A: Yes, in the same way that a tornado might be called an air current. 

Q: Is there any reason I have to be in the delivery room while my wife is in labor?
A: Not unless the word ‘alimony’ means anything to you.

Q: Is there anything I should avoid while recovering from childbirth?
A: Yes, pregnancy.

Q: Do I have to have a baby shower?
A: Not if you change the baby’s diaper very quickly.

Q: Our baby was born last week. When will my wife begin to feel and act normal again?
A: When the kids are in college.

***

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