January 23, 2018, 9:57 pm
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.07248 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.15117 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03513 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.37432 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02466 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03513 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03947 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.63391 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0315 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00743 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 34.55654 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01974 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02619 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13539 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06307 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01974 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.25863 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.19114 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 395.1056 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03943 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02465 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01899 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 11.98717 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12629 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 56.09039 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 11.14821 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01974 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.78074 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.40983 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.49517 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12017 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.94356 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.24754 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25256 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.34873 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.537 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01614 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03952 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01423 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01424 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08955 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.95481 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 177.50149 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14478 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 4.06335 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15424 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.4645 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.11993 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.2536 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 4.98796 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 262.6801 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06734 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.2595 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 23.36688 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 722.49855 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 2.02684 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.44306 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01395 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.18305 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 2.02388 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.36803 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 79.05665 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 8.11131 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 17.76199 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 21.05013 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00592 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01618 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.40616 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 163.40439 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 29.70989 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 3.03631 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 2.51372 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24018 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06017 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01225 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02645 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1822 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33221 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.99072 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 26.54431 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 47.6416 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15887 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 6.94691 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.64535 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.3059 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 14.08092 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.36718 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07768 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24178 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 7.06532 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.6045 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15516 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.01397 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02711 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00759 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01974 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06337 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06241 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.17782 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06737 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 110.75588 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07183 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07523 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.11021 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 16.49398 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07401 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15294 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26317 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13811 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15903 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02605 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01423 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.43825 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 150.5822 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 11.09138 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 395.67793 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17269 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 10.16341 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24082 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.62838 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04813 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04392 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07512 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1331 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.57902 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 44.22736 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.56937 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 71.46241 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01974 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.56325 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 160.3513 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.19686 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 447.97712 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.03691 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0496 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 10.5818 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05329 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 10.49813 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 1.92441 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.9329 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24034 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 102.41761 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 7.14229 Zimbabwe dollar

‘Game of Thrones’

IN the HBO hit series “Game of Thrones,” audiences are equally enthralled with the constant maneuverings and scheming involved in the King’s Small Council, which is made up of allies, advisors, family members, and trusted supporters. 

Sometimes the Small Council does good and ends up supporting the King; sometimes, petty squabbles and slights among its members result in overthrowing the occupant of the Iron Throne. 

The Cabinet of the President of the Philippines is in many ways similar to the fictional Small Council of King’s Landing. 

From the beginning of any president’s term, political observers keep a close watch on who ends up where, made more interesting by the inevitable jockeying and jostling between power blocs within an incoming administration. 

As members of the Official Family, cabinet secretaries are the president’s alter egos under the doctrine of qualified political agency, which has been long recognized under our legal system in order to assist the Chief Executive in running the government. As alter egos, the decision of the Cabinet as individuals on matters under the purview of their designation stand as long they are not overturned or contradicted by the source of the authority. Depending on the incumbent’s management style, cabinet members may be shuffled as frequently as your playlist on Spotify, changed as often as your smartphone, or unmoving in their positions as the traffic along EDSA, much to the consternation of well-meaning citizens. 

 (Don’t feel too bad for them, my dear millennials and feellennials. Should they feel unnecessarily abused by their boss, they can always take comfort in the fact that a majority of cabinet members can declare a sitting president unfit to discharge the powers and duties of his office by the 1987 Constitution, thereby triggering a succession mechanism.)

It goes without saying that harmony within the Cabinet in terms of policy and professionalism is imperative to the success of any administration. Conversely, in-fighting can and will effectively hamper progress in pushing for the President’s agenda. 

Case in point is the not-so cold war between Finance Secretary Carlos Dominguez and Environment Secretary Gina Lopez. Without a doubt, these two have been on a collision course since the day that Lopez made good on her promise to review existing mining agreements that are detrimental to the environment. After an audit, Lopez shut down mining operations in ten provinces, and intends to suspend more. This seemed to catch her fellow cabinet members off guard, and the rest of the Cabinet scrambled to catch up.

After an uproar from pro-mining stakeholders, Dominguez, through the Mining Industry Coordinating Council, or MICC (the Department of Finance co-chairs this, alongside DENR), ordered a review of the DENR’s audit. Before the MICC review even started, Duterte and his Cabinet intervened by putting on hold DENR’s closure orders. Even as the issue remained unresolved, Lopez faced intense grilling from members of the Commission on Appointments (CA) for her confirmation. Facing opposition left and right from pro-mining groups, local government officials, and groups fearful of losing their jobs in the mining sector, Lopez defended herself and her decisions firmly, as can be expected of a passionate advocate. Little did she know that another chink in her armor would be delivered by no other than a fellow cabinet member: Dominguez himself appeared (which by itself was very strange and unusual, considering that it involved the confirmation of a colleague) in a caucus called by the CA to tell its members that other concerned departments were not consulted on the matter, and that there was a failure to accord the mining firms due process in closing them down. Earlier, Dominguez also let slip a little barb during a Palace press briefing: “Being a secretary is not like being a crusader; being a secretary is balancing the needs of the different sectors in society,” in response to a question if Lopez’s confirmation will be good for government. Lopez has since been bypassed by the CA, and is expected to return for another round of hearings in May, as Duterte himself has confirmed the reappointment of his favorite crusader.

Skirmishes are not uncommon within the Cabinet, and to a certain extent, are expected especially when crafting national policy that cuts across wide swathes of society. But these clashes are best kept within the four walls of the Aguinaldo State Dining Room, far from public view, where differences can be settled away from prying eyes and ears. Seeing the President’s men and women in open combat also unwittingly gives us insight on Duterte’s management style: he lets them duke it out in public either because he cannot control them, or he couldn’t care less that the business of governance is impeded by these public intramurals. 

Back in Westeros, the question Lord Varys poses to Ned Stark expresses it best: “Why is it always the innocents who suffer most when you high lords play your game of thrones?” While we may be temporarily amused to witness the jousting and parrying between the combatants, in the long run, it is the public that will inevitably suffer when the valuable time and energy of our officials is spent clawing at each other rather than working together to solve the long list of maladies confronting our government today.

It’s Complicated

Issues facing government are not always about two sides. Abigail Valte’s law background and deep dive into government provides insight on its inner workings and what factors go into policy decision making.

Her once a week column is an incision on current political and social issues.
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