May 21, 2018, 1:01 pm
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.07026 UAE Dirham
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.46453 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02544 Australian Dollar
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.07071 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01913 Bahamian Dollar
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.12185 Chinese Yuan
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.01913 Cuban Peso
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1 Philippine Peso = 2.21703 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25324 Estonian Kroon
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.01619 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03941 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01415 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01416 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08822 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.89669 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 172.1829 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14035 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 3.96537 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15017 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.45456 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.11944 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.20911 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 5.13067 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 270.32715 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06863 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.30065 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 22.65162 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 803.52018 Iran Rial
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1 Philippine Peso = 2.38971 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01355 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.12078 Japanese Yen
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1 Philippine Peso = 17.21829 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 20.58408 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00578 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01569 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.27415 Kazakhstan Tenge
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.31752 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.9912 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 25.82743 Myanmar Kyat
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.15467 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 6.77253 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.65812 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.29788 Maldives Rufiyaa
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.37609 Mexican Peso
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.2393 Namibian Dollar
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.15524 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.07193 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02769 New Zealand Dollar
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.06261 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
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1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.06942 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 107.26994 Paraguayan Guarani
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.07496 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.18388 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 16.19304 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07174 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14965 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25694 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.34351 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16686 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02567 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01416 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.42483 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 149.22518 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 10.771 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 396.71513 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1674 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 9.85231 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.23938 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.61427 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04806 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04443 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0851 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12721 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.57216 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 43.52401 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.5001 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 71.05414 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01913 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.58772 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 153.05146 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 1335.85231 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 435.89057 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.09853 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04966 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 10.60895 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05165 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 10.60895 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 1.92175 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.78095 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.23941 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 99.28257 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 6.92367 Zimbabwe dollar

Implementation issues hound Day 1 of ADD

BY RAYMOND G.B. TRIBDINO AND EVAN ORIAS

THE first day of implementation of the Anti-Distracted Driving law (RA 10913) yesterday was marred with confusion and confrontations between drivers and enforcers.

At least 70 public and private motorists were apprehended by the Metropolitan Manila Development Authority on the first day, most of them “texting” while stuck in traffic on EDSA, said MMDA spokeswoman Celine Pialago.

Under RA 10913, motorists are not allowed to use their mobile communication devices, electronic entertainment and computing gadgets or devices while vehicles are in motion or temporarily stopped at a traffic light or an intersection.  It prohibits acts like making or receiving calls, writing, sending or reading text messages, playing games, watching movies, performing calculations, reading e-books, and browsing the internet.

Particularly confusing is the application of the “line of sight” rule. 

Line of sight is defined by the Department of Transportation (DOTr) as the entire windshield, including the top visible area of the dashboard. This means devices directly mounted on the windshield or on top of the dashboard violate this rule. Devices mounted below this “line of sight” are allowed. 

“It is way too subjective,” said motoring expert and road safety advocate James Deakin, referring to the provision as defined.

“I also find it safer to glance at a spot on my windscreen than somewhere on the console,” Deakin added.

This observation is similar to a study conducted by a Japanese car company on the effectiveness of heads-up displays (HUD) on cars. The internal confidential study produced in 2004 showed that information flashed on the screen or on the windshield is far safer because the distractions are less and eye movements off the road are reduced significantly.

“The law is unclear and if it is line of sight that is the issue, how about jeepneys and their signboards? Is this not a distraction and interference to line of sight?” said Ram Salome, a shuttle driver.

Uber driver Melchizedek Murc could not push a button on his smartphone after receiving a passenger along EDSA, fearing that the nearby traffic enforcer would apprehend him.

“It is still unclear what the violation is, but it was reported this morning that using a mobile device can result in a traffic ticket,” Murc said.

Lawyer Robby Consunji, former president of the Car Awards Group Inc. and a columnist for Top Gear Magazine, said the very implementation of the law is questionable.

“The IRR (implementing rules and regulations) is dated April 4 and was published on May 5. It was uploaded on the DOTr website on May 17 and made effective the next day,” Consunji told Malaya Business Insight.

“The power to do an information campaign (as stated in the IRR) arises only after its effectivity on May 18 for a period of three months,” he said.

“It is another ground to question the lack of notice to the affected public,” he added.

Consunji also asked if there is any verifiable data that show electronic devices are a leading cause of motor vehicle accidents in the Philippines. 

Ariel Inton of the Lawyers for Commuters Safety and Protection (LCSP) said his group is all for the implementation of the law but the implementation must be clear and not rushed. 

Transportation Assistant Secretary Mark de Leon said the law exempts motorists who are using their mobile phones in making or taking an emergency call or if they are reporting a crime or a prohibited act, accident, natural calamity, bomb threat, terrorist activities and the like.

The MMDA said of the 77 apprehended between 6 a.m. to 3 p.m. under the no-contact apprehension scheme, 47 were motorcycle riders, 19 private motorists, six truck drivers, and five public utility vehicle drivers.

The plate numbers of the vehicles will be forwarded to the Land Transportation Office to identify the vehicle owners. The MMDA will then send summonses to the violators and ask them to pay the P5,000 for the first offense. 

Aside from public and private vehicles, the law also covers wheeled agricultural machineries, construction equipment, and other forms of conveyances such as bicycles, pedicabs, trolleys, “habal-habal,” “kuliglig,” wagons, carriages, and carts that may either be, human-powered or pulled by an animal, as long as the same are operated or driven in public highways or streets.

Motorists are allowed to use hands-free applications like Waze, Google Maps, and Spotify or gadgets like dash cams as long as these do not interfere their line of sight. 

LTO chief Edgar Galvante said drivers with cellphones mounted near the rear-view mirror will be apprehended. 

He said it is a preventive measure to avoid or lessen road crashes and injuries. It also promotes road safety and responsible driving among motorists.

MMDA data show an average of 262 crashes daily or 11 crashes per hour in the metropolis. Last year, the agency recorded 109,322 road crashes in the metropolis but its database does not include statistics on distracted driving. 

The LTO has deputized members of the PNP-Highway Patrol Group, Metropolitan Manila Development Authority traffic enforcers, and local traffic constables to implement the law. 

Violators will pay a fine of P10,000 for the second offense and P15,000 for the third offense with a three-month suspension of driver’s license. 

Operators and owners of public utility vehicles and commercial vehicles are also liable if their drivers violate the law.
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Column of the Day

Still working as ‘endo’ contractuals (2)

Dahli Aspillera's picture
By DAHLI ASPILLERA | May 21,2018
‘DOLE to name companies hiring 555 temporaries for key roles permanent in their operations. “Your days are numbered. The government will not rest until we end this shameful labor practice.” – PRRD.’

Opinion of the Day

Smoking weeds

Jose Bayani Baylon's picture
By JOSE BAYANI BAYLON | May 21, 2018
‘Because we believe that in a democracy the value of every individual (in this case, the voter) is recognized as equal, and the collective is given the power and the opportunity to choose.’