February 23, 2018, 10:12 pm
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.07045 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.04297 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03415 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.38059 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02443 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03415 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03837 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.59409 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0304 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00723 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 33.58872 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01918 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02533 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13159 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06235 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01918 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.2325 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.18295 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 384.03989 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03832 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02429 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.018 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 11.42605 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12152 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 54.88202 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 10.87186 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01918 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.71801 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.39493 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.3921 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.11601 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.94226 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.17652 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.24369 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33858 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.52177 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01557 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03825 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01371 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01377 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08533 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.89967 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 172.74122 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14073 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 3.9296 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15011 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.45024 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.11584 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.216 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 4.85824 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 261.23153 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06714 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.24329 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 22.71245 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 713.12103 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 1.9248 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.40936 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01359 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.0619 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 1.9413 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.3061 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 77.09572 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 7.62709 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 17.26453 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 20.55496 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00575 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01573 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.12565 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 158.52676 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 28.96605 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 2.97621 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 2.45904 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.22463 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05848 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0119 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02544 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17647 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.31853 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.95396 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 25.47477 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 45.90946 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15451 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 6.71398 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.62536 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.29868 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 13.76098 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.35911 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07494 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.22327 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.88663 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.59477 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15035 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 1.98703 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02611 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00738 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01918 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06229 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0629 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.11989 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06472 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 106.82716 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06982 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07256 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.0862 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 16.12737 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07193 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14866 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.2582 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.34501 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15536 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02534 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01372 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.42597 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 146.36485 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 10.78074 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 381.75523 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16785 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 9.87876 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.22325 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.60368 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04586 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0428 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07262 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12717 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.55966 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 43.06541 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.51746 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 69.67197 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01918 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.54556 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 156.62766 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 478.3426 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 435.71839 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 1.98465 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04817 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 10.20986 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05179 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 10.20986 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 1.85248 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.79474 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.22325 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 99.5492 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 6.94226 Zimbabwe dollar

House threatens to go solo on Con-Ass

AFTER being spurned by the Senate, Speaker Pantaleon Alvarez yesterday said the House of Representatives will go it alone in convening a constituent assembly to introduce amendments to the Constitution.

“We’ll push through and continue with our work. We will satisfy the three-fourths of all the members as required by the Constitution (to propose changes),” Alvarez told dzMM.

Article XVII, Sec. 1 of the Constitution provides that “any amendment to, or revision of, this Constitution may be proposed by the Congress, upon a vote of three-fourths of all its Members.”

The provision is interpreted either as the Senate and the House voting separately or as one.

Senators have agreed to boycott the House initiative after congressmen adopted Concurrent Resolution No. 9 convening the House and the Senate into a con-ass to amend or revise the Constitution.

The senators insisted on voting separately from the congressmen, claiming that joint voting will drown them out. The House has 292 members while the Senate has 23.

Alvarez, a lawyer, said the House will push the envelope on Charter change since the Supreme Court will eventually rule on how the two chambers should vote.

Alvarez insisted that voting should be done jointly since the Constitution does not specify that the two chambers should vote separately.

“To me, the letter of the Constitution is clear. It says three-fourths of all the members of Congress, meaning we all have the same votes,” he said.

The Speaker said it would be unfair to congressmen if the voting will be separate since they are the direct representatives of the people, with a specific local constituency, compared to the senators who are considered national officials.

“We’re the nearest link to the people, so why would the vote of a senator hold more weight than that of congressman?” Alvarez said.

Alvarez said he would respect the Senate’s plan to hold its own hearings on Cha-cha if senators will be able to muster the constitutional requirement.

“That’s fine and I’ll respect it if they (Senate) have three-fourths of all the members of Congress. But they’re only 22 there so how can we count the three-fourths?” he said.

Alvarez expressed doubts on the implementation of Sen. Panfilo Lacson’s proposal to expel the senator/s who will attend the House Charter change sessions. 

“I don’t know how they can do that. How can you expel (a senator)? That’s a duly elected position and it (joining congressmen’s con-ass) is not a ground for expulsion,” he said.

The Speaker also doubts that a senator’s position to attend the House-initiated con-ass can be considered unethical, saying it is just an exercise of a constitutional duty.

He said he has not yet spoken with senators to personally invite them to attend the deliberations but he is not discounting the possibility that a few may still join them in the con-ass.

“I think it’s impossible that not even one would agree to sit with us,” said Alvarez.

He said he expects Senate President Aquilino Pimentel III, president of the ruling PDP-Laban, to speak out and participate in convening a con-ass.

“He does not have to bring everyone (senators). It would be enough even if he will be the only who’ll join us,” he said.

He said the PDP was founded by former Sen. Aquilino Pimentel, Jr., the Senate President’s own father, who is a federalism advocate.

Alvarez said he and President Duterte joined the party because they were convinced of the merits of federalism.

HANDS OFF

Senate minority leader Franklin Drilon said the Senate has the “exclusive right” to discipline its members who violated its own rules, and this could not be questioned by anyone.

“The last time I read the Constitution, each house of Congress has the exclusive right to discipline its members, which cannot be questioned by anyone, not even the Supreme Court,” Drilon said in a text message.

Sen. Francis Escudero said the House should respect the power and prerogatives of the Senate.

Lacson said the senator who steps on Batasan soil would be expelled from the Senate.

Lacson said it was merely a suggestion that he made during the caucus “to emphasize the fact that we should act as one body in preserving the integrity of our institution.”

“While I admit that the summary expulsion with the speed that I described it is an exaggeration, I was nevertheless serious that such a grave offense of betraying the Senate as an institution should be meted the maximum penalty of dismissal,” he said.

He said none of the senators objected to the proposal.

He said attending a joint session of the House without authorization from the Senate by way of an adopted resolution is “downright idiotic, if not reprehensible, especially if done with malicious intent.”

Senate President Aquilino Pimentel III told Alvarez to do his job and let the Senate do its own.

“The chair (of the committee on constitutional amendments and revision of codes), Sen. (Francis) Pangilinan has given me his word that he will proceed in all good faith and with full transparency and at a reasonable pace,” he said.

Pangilinan also cautioned Alvarez on insisting on joint voting because the people will get mad at an “illegal and selfish Cha-cha.”

Senate President pro tempore Ralph Recto said there is no way the House could conduct its own Cha-cha.

“It takes two to Cha-Cha. Going solo is shadow dancing. Or going up the boxing ring for the 12 full rounds with no opponent and then triumphantly declaring yourself winner by unanimous decision,” Recto said.

Sen. Miguel Zubiri called for a legislative summit among leaders of the Senate and House to break the possible deadlock as to the manner of voting on constitutional amendments.

Sen. Grace Poe said: “Federalism is not a ‘magic pill’ to address all of our country’s problems. If we wanted to strengthen local autonomy, some issues are better addressed through amending the Local Government Code. We need stronger institutions not strongmen. We should enact the Freedom of Information and Anti-Dynasty bills in order to ensure meaningful participation of people in government, with or without Federalism.’

Villanueva also questioned if there is really a need for constitutional amendments, or if the country’s problems could be solved by legislation.

Sen. Paolo Benigno Aquino IV suggested that an anti-dynasty law be first enacted ahead of moves to amend the 1987 Constitution to gain the trust of the people.
 
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