December 18, 2017, 12:51 pm
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.07288 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.24593 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03533 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.34712 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02593 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03533 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0397 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.63815 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03288 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00748 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 34.75546 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01985 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02675 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13617 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06539 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01985 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.2763 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.20411 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 397.3799 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03965 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02552 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01965 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 12.62406 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13118 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 59.40849 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 11.184 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01985 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.86245 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.43364 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.50992 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12575 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.94204 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.28011 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26427 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.35252 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.5391 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01689 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04119 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01488 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0149 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08949 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.93628 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 177.61016 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14561 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 4.01171 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15502 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.46602 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12717 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.24851 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 5.30468 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 269.45216 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0697 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.27173 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 23.50139 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 706.60975 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 2.09111 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.47122 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01404 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.23456 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 2.04347 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.38392 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 79.89281 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 8.1582 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 17.86423 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 21.58495 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00599 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01628 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.65919 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 164.78761 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 29.88289 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 3.0389 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 2.48432 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26141 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06051 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01232 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02704 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1878 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33869 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.03414 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 27.03454 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 48.15403 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15967 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 6.9869 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.67209 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.30905 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 14.16276 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.37963 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08094 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.2608 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 7.10599 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.60838 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16635 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.03573 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02839 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00762 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01985 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06535 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06434 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.17745 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07099 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 111.57205 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07225 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07797 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.1679 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 16.58892 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07443 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15358 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26852 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13219 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16899 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02675 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01489 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.44077 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 151.44898 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 11.09567 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 413.80507 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17368 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 10.22191 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26054 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.6449 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04961 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04557 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07666 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13159 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.5944 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 44.30329 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.54875 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 71.55617 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01985 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.57046 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 160.57959 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.198 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 450.55577 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.09845 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05144 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 11.07165 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05359 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 11.49782 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 2.00337 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.96129 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26079 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 103.00714 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 7.18341 Zimbabwe dollar

Duterte endorses Asean econ integration

PRESIDENT Duterte yesterday endorsed the proposed 16-nation Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership (RCEP), which is expected to promote and strengthen the markets in the region.

The RCEP is a proposed free-trade pact among the 10-member countries of Asean, namely, Brunei Darussalam, Cambodia, Indonesia, Lao PDR, Malaysia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, and Vietnam; and major trading partners China, South Korea, Australia, India, Japan and New Zealand.

The President, in addressing the 50th anniversary of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (Asean) grand celebration held at the PICC, said the RCEP should be concluded swiftly, especially now that the United States-led Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) is no longer available.

American President Donald Trump, after assuming office, said he is not inclined to continue the TPP. The Philippines had been exerting efforts to be invited to join the TPP under the previous administration but Duterte had said joining the economic bloc would be disadvantageous to especially in providing some affordable products like generic medicines.

“We must take a serious look at the economic integration. Asean has a bigger stake than any other part of the world in standing up against protectionism and securing the rules of the game in the international trade. The Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership or RCEP will provide further impetus to our efforts. Negotiations should conclude swiftly as decided by RCEP leaders in 2016. I was reminded that the Trans-Pacific, it was a dream that was no longer there,” Duterte said.

RCEP aims to strengthen the regional markets and cover trade-in goods and services, investments, economic and technical cooperation, intellectual property rights, competition policy, and dispute settlement, among others.

The President, during the Asean anniversary, called for greater participation from the private sector in promoting economic growth not just in each country but in the whole region.

Duterte said each Asean government is committed to providing an environment that is conducive to doing businesses and for investments to thrive.

“I call on our private sector to play a bigger role in spurring and sustaining growth. Public Private Partnership must be harnessed fully to lift our peoples from poverty,” he said as he acknowledged the role of the Asean Business Advisory Council and how its “Alliance for Prosperity for All” program is helping the micro, small and medium enterprises, and people from the grassroots to grow.

The President, during the event, also called on Asean leaders to unite against lawless elements, corruption and transnational crimes.

“We want a region that is secure -- where our peoples can live without fear from the lawless elements and the debilitating effects of corruption and transnational crimes,” he said.

Duterte also said there should be mutual respect and the rule of law must reign supreme in relations between Asean-member states.

Following the event, the President also received the foreign ministers from Asean and non-Asean countries in separate courtesy meetings at the PICC. The courtesy call of Japanese Foreign Minister Taro Kano followed.

VOICE OF STABILITY

Foreign Affairs Secretary Alan Peter Cayetano said the Philippines will have a “loud but calming voice” in international affairs as part of the country’s independent foreign policy.

Cayetano said it was the marching order of President Duterte when he announced early on in his presidency that the country would play a stabilizing voice in the international community.

He added this was also the reason he accepted the post as foreign affairs chief.

“When President Duterte announced to the Philippines that we will now be standing on our feet, that we will now be implementing an independent foreign policy, that the country will have a loud but calming, firm but stabilizing voice in the international community, I could not say no,” Cayetano said in his speech at the Asean anniversary.

It will be recalled that the release of the joint communiqué was delayed Saturday due the South China Sea issue. 

Cayetano admitted yesterday that he almost lost hope that a consensus could be found considering the national interests of the member-countries at play but that in the end, he and his counterparts were able to agree to disagree.

Eventually, the communiqué overcame the impasse and called for militarization to be avoided in the South China Sea.

It also expressed concern about reclamation in the disputed waters and emphasized the importance of self-restraint to ease tension in the area.

Cayetano also said Asean wanted to play a constructive role in easing tension in the Korean peninsula but stressed the regional bloc will support United Nations Security Council resolutions against Pyongyang’s nuclear weapons and ballistic missile programs.

In a press briefing Tuesday night, Cayetano said he told the North Korean delegation headed by Foreign Minister Ri Yong-ho that Asean wants the problem to be solved peacefully but Pyongyang must reciprocate.

“We have to get them to denuclearize peacefully but what if they don’t, that is the big question and we have to be very careful. Some states spoke out that they are supportive of UN Security Council resolutions but that there should not be use of force because it might spiral into a large conflict,” he said.

“The ball is in the hands of North Korea to give some kind of opening and the other ball is to the rest of the world. So it’s a sort of a paradox to get them out of the nuclear weapons program. It’s a very dangerous deadlock right now,” he added.

Cayetano said any military action against North Korea will result in a larger conflict that might engulf not only the Korean peninsula but other parts of the region considering the military capabilities of the parties.

He said this is the reason Asean wants to play the peacemaker to resolve the problem, especially since several members of the bloc maintained a relationship with Pyongyang.

He said Asean through its joint communiqué against the North’s nuclear weapons program and ballistic missile tests has already drawn the line. 

He said Ri told him that Pyongyang is friendly with Asean and the problem in the Korean peninsula was brought by the United States, making the security situation much more complex. 

Cayetano said Pyongyang will not be expelled from the Asean Regional Forum, the lone security summit where the isolated country sends its top envoy to engage in dialogue with other foreign ministers, since there is no mechanism to remove someone from the dialogue.

CANCELED TALKS

A scheduled meeting between the foreign ministers of China and Vietnam was cancelled on the sidelines of a regional gathering, Chinese embassy officials said, amid growing tension between the two countries over the South China Sea.

Vietnam has emerged the most vocal opponent of China’s claims in the waterway, where more than $3 trillion in cargo pass every year.

The Chinese embassy officials gave no reason for the cancellation of the meeting scheduled for Monday in Manila between China’s Wang Yi and Vietnam’s Pham Binh Minh.

A Chinese foreign ministry official said they had “already met”. Vietnam’s foreign ministry did not respond immediately to a request for comment.

After the Asean meeting, China’s foreign minister Wang Yi had called out “some countries” who voiced concern over island reclamation.

Wang said China had not carried out reclamation for two years. 

Satellite images have shown that Vietnam has carried out reclamation work in two sites in the disputed seas in recent years.

The Metropolitan Manila Development Authority said traffic was heavy yesterday on Roxas Boulevard in Manila and Pasay City.  – With Evan Orias and Reuters
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