June 24, 2018, 8:28 pm
Facebook iconTwitter iconYouTube iconGoogle+ icon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06901 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.02912 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03401 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.5072 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02524 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03345 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03758 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.57159 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03155 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00712 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 32.90079 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01879 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02526 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1289 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07111 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01879 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.28053 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.19402 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 376.17437 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03754 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02493 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01856 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 11.99061 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12218 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 54.75385 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 10.57591 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01879 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.77772 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.41526 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.33615 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12016 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.92728 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.1963 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25225 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33484 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.51146 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01612 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03918 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01416 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01417 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08979 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.87956 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 169.07178 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14072 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 3.87599 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14741 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.44878 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.11882 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.24803 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 5.23224 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 264.43067 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06764 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.27568 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 22.24728 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 798.38407 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 2.03119 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.45509 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01333 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.06417 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 1.89121 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.28183 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 76.00526 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 7.92522 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 16.91094 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 20.86622 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00568 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01541 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.38595 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 158.00451 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 28.292 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 2.98572 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 2.74709 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25254 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05728 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01166 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02548 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1786 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.3177 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.98891 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 25.98647 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 45.97896 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15183 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 6.67042 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.65295 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.29256 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 13.4053 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.37584 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07518 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25239 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.72679 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.59207 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15205 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.03401 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02719 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00723 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01879 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06134 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0609 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.28222 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06966 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 106.55769 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06839 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07509 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.18236 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 15.96073 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07046 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1479 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25235 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33738 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16635 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02551 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01417 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.41725 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 149.94363 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 10.72905 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 394.98309 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16441 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 9.67644 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25202 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.61856 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04882 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04333 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08786 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12682 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.56924 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 42.63435 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.49267 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 72.51597 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01879 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.59451 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 147.50094 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 1499.4363 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 430.10147 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.07159 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0488 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 10.56614 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05073 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 10.56614 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 1.92165 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.69466 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25241 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 97.51033 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 6.80008 Zimbabwe dollar

Dengue expert reveals Sanofi’s lapses

A LEADING US expert on dengue research yesterday said he was very surprised the Philippine government proceeded with the mass immunization program using Dengvaxia to combat dengue among children aged nine years and up.

Appearing during the resumption of the hearing by the Senate blue ribbon and health committees, Dr. Scott Halstead of the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences in Bethesda, Maryland said he earlier warned that blood tests should have been done before the vaccine was given.

“I made a suggestion that before the Dengvaxia was given to everybody, there should be a blood test. Everybody said “hahaha’ that is impossible and that nobody has done that before. But I am sorry, that’s not “hahaha” that’s possible,” Halstead said.

“I was quite upset that this mass immunization was going forward,” he added, prompting Gordon to reply “I agree with you, Doctor.”

Halstead said he had a dialogue with Sanofi Pasteur, makers of Dengvaxia, for several years that its vaccine is safe for seropositives or those who had previous infection of dengue.

He said a blood test would have separated the children who had previous dengue infection from the seronegatives or those who have yet to contract dengue.

Gordon said giving the Dengvaxia without first testing whether the individual who is going to be vaccinated is seronegative or seropositive is a fault of the government, the implementor of the mass immunization program.

“Sanofi was able to bring the vaccine but our government is apparently in a hurry maybe because of the election, maybe because of some reason,” he said.

Gordon said it is the right of the parents to know the effects and possible consequences if they allow their children to be vaccinated.

“Even if Sanofi had the best intention but many died because they were not given the right information…Government should have ensured Sanofi’s responsibility before giving mass immunization,” he added.

Halstead said he is sure that Sanofi doesn’t want to cause harm to anybody but added he nearly “fell off his chair” when the pharmaceutical giant recommended that the vaccine be only given to those aged 9 and older after a three-year review in 2015.

He said this prompted him to write a paper on this matter.

“When the three-year review of Sanofi was published, I read two-to-five year-old children were hospitalized at a higher rate than the control group. If I’d been here, you would have seen me. I fell off my chair.”

Sanofi’s allegation that nine years was a safe year because there are some intrinsic difference between nine-year-olds and younger, simply did not fit the biology of the human species, he added.

Halstead said there is a safe vaccine against dengue but it is not yet available in the Philippines.

Dr. Antonio Dans of the National Academy of Science and Technology claimed that Sanofi knew of the risks of Dengvaxia but buried in its studies the evidence of the risk on seronegative individuals.

He said Sanofi should have informed the public about the risks before endorsing to the government the dengue vaccine.

Her said they even tried to communicate their findings.

“The findings suggest that the vaccine could be harmful in seronegative children or those who have not yet contracted dengue of whatever age -- not just more than 9 [years old], not just more than 5,” he explained.

But Sanofi’s regional representative Thomas Triomphe told the inquiry that they only found out about the potential risk to seronegative individuals in November last year, prompting them to issue an advisory.

During the hearing, Gordon also said then President Aquino apparently rushed the procurement of P3.5 billion worth of Dengvaxia after he met with Sanofi executives in France.

He said even if then Health Secretary Janette Garin was the “captain” Aquino as president was the commander-in-chief.

“Somebody has to be responsible. Folks, who pushed the button? Who said gawin na natin ‘to? Damn the torpedoes, full speed ahead?” Gordon asked Ubial, with the latter saying it should be Garin since she was then the DOH chief.

“When you see the President of the Philippines meeting Sanofi executives in a foreign country, are you surprised that the timeline will be so fast? Secretary Garin could be the captain, but the commander-in-chief of the captain is the one that gives the signals, especially kung lalabas yung pera na ₱3.5 billion to buy the medicine,” he said.

“The people who pushed the button, the president, the budget secretary, the health secretary and all those who disregarded conditions and protocols, even violating procurement provisions,” he added.

Aquino in previous testimony in the Senate denied the implementation of the mass anti-dengue vaccination program was rushed.

Gordon also told the parents who attended the inquiry that he would be filing a bill that will allow the children affected by the Dengvaxia mess to use the P1.2 billion refunded by Sanofi for unused vaccines for their treatment.

Health Secretary Francisco Duque III said his office has asked for authorization from the Department of Budget and Management to use the funds for the affected families.

Gordon said Tuesday’s hearing - the 7th on the issue - would be the last. He assured the public the committee will issue a “hard-hitting report” on its findings.

In his opening statement, he said the report was already 90 percent completed but new information could be included. 

Gordon later told reporters that “criminal proceedings will definitely” be filed against those involved in the Dengvaxia mess.

He said the charges could range from dereliction of duty to negligence through bad faith, violation of the government procurement reform act to reckless imprudence and even murder.

He said the respondents could include Aquino.

Duque said the Department of Health (DOH) is preparing to address the stress and other emotional and psychological concerns of Dengvaxia recipients and their parents.

Duque visited the Dengvaxia fast lane of the Quezon City General Hospital yesterday.

He said training for health personnel that will provide psychosocial services is already underway.

“That is quite in order and our Health Emergency Management Bureau is on top of the situation. They are doing training by deploying psycho-social experts to do the training,” he said.

He also said the DOH is in talks with the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) and the Philippine Red Cross (PRC) for possible collaboration. – With Gerard Naval
Category: 
Rating: 
No votes yet

Column of the Day

Unbridled brazenness

DODY LACUNA's picture
By DODY LACUNA | June 22,2018
‘Outrage over the killing of priests today in our country will persist and, if real justice is not served soon will, in all probability, combine for a growing social and political unrest with a polarized Church.’

Opinion of the Day

Tough days ahead

Jose Bayani Baylon's picture
By JOSE BAYANI BAYLON | June 22, 2018
‘It’s high stakes and tightrope walking that also means that a small miscalculation could upend everything.’