June 24, 2018, 10:39 am
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.06901 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.02912 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03401 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.5072 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02524 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03345 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03758 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.57159 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03155 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00712 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 32.90079 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01879 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02526 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1289 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07111 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01879 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.28053 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.19402 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 376.17437 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03754 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02493 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01856 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 11.99061 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12218 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 54.75385 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 10.57591 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01879 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.77772 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.41526 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.33615 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12016 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.92728 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.1963 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25225 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33484 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.51146 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01612 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03918 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01416 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01417 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08979 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.87956 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 169.07178 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14072 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 3.87599 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14741 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.44878 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.11882 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.24803 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 5.23224 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 264.43067 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06764 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.27568 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 22.24728 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 798.38407 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 2.03119 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.45509 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01333 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.06417 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 1.89121 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.28183 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 76.00526 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 7.92522 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 16.91094 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 20.86622 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00568 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01541 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.38595 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 158.00451 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 28.292 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 2.98572 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 2.74709 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25254 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05728 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01166 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02548 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1786 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.3177 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.98891 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 25.98647 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 45.97896 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15183 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 6.67042 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.65295 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.29256 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 13.4053 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.37584 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07518 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25239 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.72679 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.59207 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15205 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.03401 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02719 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00723 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01879 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06134 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0609 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.28222 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06966 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 106.55769 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06839 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07509 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.18236 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 15.96073 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07046 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1479 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25235 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33738 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16635 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02551 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01417 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.41725 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 149.94363 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 10.72905 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 394.98309 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16441 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 9.67644 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25202 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.61856 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04882 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04333 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08786 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12682 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.56924 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 42.63435 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.49267 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 72.51597 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01879 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.59451 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 147.50094 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 1499.4363 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 430.10147 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.07159 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0488 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 10.56614 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05073 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 10.56614 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 1.92165 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.69466 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25241 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 97.51033 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 6.80008 Zimbabwe dollar

Marrying rich

Of course it’s not a crime to marry rich. Wouldn’t you want to marry the man or woman you’re madly in love with — who also happens to be filthy rich? Or just plain rich? 

Most of us would probably pounce on the opportunity, given the chance to do so! We’re not talking about the earth-shaking magnitude of Prince Harry and Meghan’s marriage, though. Just the ordinary, garden-variety kind of “marrying rich” which we see with some friends and relatives around us. 

There are those who marry rich and take it rather well. They actually evolve into a better person. This is a fine sight to see! They slowly “grow into” the wealth they got married to. Like a gently-broken-in Gucci loafer. 

I guess the first visual changes can be seen in their wardrobe and accesories. Throw in watches and jewellery, too. That subtle whiff of some pricey perfume. Also the places they go to, even for a quick vacation, an unplanned coffee, a surreptitious dessert. You may notice certain gestures, manners, and mannerisms becoming more refined. A softer voice, perhaps. And an understated elegance that speaks volumes. 

But just as an aside: it’s not only the old rich who have a casual, understated sense of elegance, right? Even someone who faithfully shops at the tiangge can have understated elegance as well! For instance, my daughter’s barkada in Ateneo used to have this constant contest among them: who has the cheapest BUT most elegant finds? How proud they were when they won! Why? Well, because it was not a question of money. It was a question of taste! 

So back to our topic — I have friends who married rich yet preserved their identities, thank goodness. Their fashion sense improved significantly, with the help of their wealthy, new in-laws who were ready to give sensible advice. 

 “In the beginning, I’d just shop where my MIL (mom-in-law) shopped. I asked her for advice, which she graciously gave, and then I bought what we both liked! That way, her good taste rubbed off on me, easily. And that way, we became fast friends. Same with my SILs.” 

Very wise girl, don’t you think? Now, she has already developed a fashion sense all her own. Expensive, yes. But in her own style. Still elegant and understated, just like her “old, middle-income self” — she tells me, with much laughter. 

So, while their preferences may have become more discriminating and expensive, their personalities can remain basically the same — unlike Filipinos who’ve been in the States just a few months, yet talk with a twang that’s bigger than Texas. You’ve endured them, right? 

I’ve also observed that the ones who grow into wealth, quietly and gracefully, are the secure ones. Nothing to hide. Nothing to prove. No need to impress. 

They share their wealth without much fanfare — offering their houses for reunions and celebrations without having to show off anything. They have this delightful, unmistakable lack of airs. I call it humility. I call it graciousness and simple kindness when they offer to host everything,
or almost everything: the venue, a finely-catered meal, waiter service, fun give-aways for games or whatnot, even take-homes when there are lots of leftovers. 

This, I call simple thoughtfulness and hospitality. The generosity of a friend who ran into some good fortune — and is now happy to share it with others! Without showing off. Without making you feel beholden. Without making a big deal of it. Oh, how I just love it when people do this.

That, to me, is REAL class. 

But unfortunately, marrying rich can also make some people evolve into someone absolutely annoying. These are the ones who, unfortunately for them and their friends, have not adjusted to wealth well. They predictably flaunt everything that’s expensive about them — their bags, their shoes, their watches, their rocks, their perfumes, their gadgets — everything has to be branded, even if it was just bought in Greenhills. They prattle about their houses and cars, where they’ve been to, where they’ve eaten, who they hobnobbed with, where their kids go to school in Europe or the States (throw in Vancouver and China, too), who’s the chef that catered their latest party at home, etc. etc. You just have to listen politely to such mindless arrogance, and change the topic fast, the minute they pause to take a breath. 

Of course, when they offer their houses for reunions, it’s always done with a flourish, as if you were being invited to Windsor Castle. And when you eat what they serve, it’s like you have to be reminded that every mouthful was paid for by the host. Well. That’s one sure way to get indigestion! So I hardly go to reunions or parties where the host displays the lamentable behaviour of the nouveau riche, as the French call them. Sa Pilipino, it’s more malutong: it’s called “biglang yaman.”  

Is it harder to marry rich if you’re a man? Yes. Definitely. Some men had nervous breakdowns because they couldn’t take the pressure of having to measure up to the standards of their rich in-laws. Some became hard and ruthless, in their frenzy to prove themselves. Some became soft and lazy — name-dropping their wealthy in-laws to snag a deal, to get into organizations or conservative country clubs, to elbow their way into the upper crust. Yes. It’s tougher for a man if they marry rich because it always looks like they’re glorified escorts of their wives — unless they make their own fortunes. 

With women, it’s easier. They just have to gracefully adjust to their new environment, be likeable or lovable to their in-laws and new social circle, be pleasant without pandering to anyone, be authentic without trying too hard and in the process, sticking out like a sore thumb. 

Most of all, it’s wise if they cultivate constant humility, without being a doormat for anyone who tries to bully them. Strength with humility is an ultra-powerful combination that commands respect from others, regardless of socio-economic status. 

If you married rich, if you planned to marry rich and have succeeded, there’s no harm in that. It’s like you married a violinist, or planned to fall in love with a violinist, and actually married one. The important thing is you use your good fortune and status in life to help others — to influence them to also live a life of humility and generosity, because you have been given much. 

You know what the Bible says, “...to whom much is given, much is required.” This pertains to talents, position, power, resources, spiritual gifts, and everything else that makes one more blessed than others. 

In short, use the privileged position you have to help others, to share your blessings, to add color and delight to people’s lives, if you cannot do anything more major than that.

Never think you’re superior just because you can afford the more expensive — but not necessarily the finer — things in life. There are many, many fine things that money cannot buy. Like peace of mind, contentment, good character, humility, integrity, authenticity, REAL taste and class. 

Only the very insecure will flaunt what they’re hiding behind —  to look valuable and significant.
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