November 25, 2017, 9:54 am
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.07254 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.22066 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03521 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.34299 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02592 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03516 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03951 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.60589 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03253 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00746 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 34.51185 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01976 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02656 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13552 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06373 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01976 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.27914 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.20568 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 395.49586 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03947 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0251 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01934 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 12.5162 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13038 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 58.75346 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 11.09502 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01976 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.82714 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.42146 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.5079 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12329 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.94607 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.26118 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25918 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.34868 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.53457 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01656 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04139 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01481 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01481 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.09104 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.92967 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 177.69657 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1449 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 4.07922 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15426 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.46501 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12517 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.22145 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 5.16041 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 266.6535 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0693 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.27625 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 23.03437 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 696.06876 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 2.03813 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.47234 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01397 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.20192 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 2.03576 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.37669 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 79.67207 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 8.28586 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 17.77953 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 21.38305 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00596 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0162 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.52213 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 164.26314 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 29.7906 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 3.03635 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 2.46247 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.27292 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06023 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01226 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02699 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.18541 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.34526 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.01442 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 26.92612 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 48.20229 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15888 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 6.91426 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.68451 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.30047 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 14.14757 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.36633 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0813 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.27483 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 7.03279 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.60352 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16042 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.04563 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02867 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0076 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01976 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06392 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06337 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.07685 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0697 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 111.98933 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07516 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07679 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.15428 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 16.47807 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07408 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15686 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26162 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13157 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16365 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02658 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01482 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.43868 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 150.13829 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 11.00356 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 406.44806 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17286 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 10.17345 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.27485 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.6448 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04877 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04522 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07781 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13097 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.5918 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 44.15251 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.53121 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 71.55275 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01976 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.57349 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 159.22561 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.19705 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 448.93324 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.09581 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05077 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 10.85875 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05334 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 10.88937 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 1.96543 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.93678 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.27485 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 102.51877 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 7.14935 Zimbabwe dollar

A child well-loved

A child well-loved 

Will know how to love well. 

A child mistreated 

Will mistreat others as well. 

When I wrote those two sentences recently, it was to preserve a thought that I felt was well-worth writing about, at a later time. And I’m glad that today seems to be the perfect time. 

Yes. We don’t have to look very far. The world is falling apart because of parents who failed to love their children well. Nevertheless, whether we were well-loved or not by our parents, we are still responsible for our own choices, our own lives. 

Life is all about relationships. We succeed or fail, depending on how good we are at maintaining our relationships: with God, with our spouse, our children, our parents, our siblings, the people at work; our friends, our peers, our helpers, our business associates, our clients, etc. While we may not get along with everyone, how we treat people largely determines how successful we truly are in life. 

Many people forget that. Many times they sacrifice relationships for “success.” They think that being rich or powerful or having the top notch in the totem pole is more important than having good relationships. So they ditch people for things. They forget that in the spiritual realm, people last forever -- but things don’t. 

If you define success in terms of money, position, power, or fame, then you have a feeble and rather shallow definition of success. 

For instance, a gambler defines success in terms of money -- having the biggest winnings. Same thing with a small-time pickpocket who defines success as having the biggest pickings. Or a devious fish vendor who aims to “profit more,” thanks to his dishonest scales. 

Money is their one definition of success. So if that’s your definition too, well, consider yourself in the same league as a gambler, a pickpocket, or a dishonest fish vendor. 

As parents, if we raise our children to love objects more than people, they most probably will. They will grow up materialistic, object-obsessed, and stuck on status symbols. They won’t have qualms about hurting others just to get what they want. They’ll define themselves through things and price tags. They’ll be social chameleons or social junkies who won’t have their own identities. 

If we raise our children to “win at all costs,” then they’ll most probably do just that. They’ll most likely grow up fiercely or underhandedly competitive. And maybe, also unscrupulous, bereft of integrity. Winning will push them, fuel them, define them. Or shatter them into a million little pieces. Think nervous breakdowns, clinical depression, suicides, or at the very least, extreme uptightness. You know what I mean, right? Nothing is enough for these people. They always, always have to know more, do better, feel superior to someone else -- a sibling, a friend, an office mate. The competition never ends. Eventually most of them self-destruct. 

Parents can bully their children into submission -- and these children will, most probably, bully others as well. Winning through intimidation -- it’s an old ploy that still works. Bullies bully others without too much imagination: cursing and coarse joking, veiled or blatant threats, physical aggression, lewd innuendos, flagrant abuse of power, sexual harassment, the systematic persecution and humiliation of victims, character assassination, patronage politics, etc. Bullies always end up having unsafe and destructive relationships with others -- especially the parents who bullied them. 

On the other hand, parents who are permissive, laid back, or compliant end up raising spoiled brats, underachievers, quitters, whiners and complainers who blame everyone for their problems, and crybabies who can’t take failure or defeat. They won’t take responsibility for themselves so they find their escape in drugs, alcohol, pornography, casual sex, computer games, and other addictions. They abort their babies, max out their credit cards, and live off their parents (or whoever they can latch on to for money). Each generation of spoiled brats will invent new and more horrific ways of escaping from reality and its responsibilities. 

That’s why the destruction of our children should stop here. The process of strengthening and building them up should start now, in our own homes. We must love our children well. Consistently. Relentlessly. 

Loving our children well is surprisingly quite simple. But it’s never easy. It means we must raise them to first, respect and obey God; second, respect and obey their parents and other figures of authority; and third, respect others. 

When children are taught to consistently respect and obey God and their parents, they develop a deep love for them. They experience love, significance, and security in their families. They grow up secure, responsible, balanced, resilient, respectful of others, able to accept failure or defeat. Experiencing love from God and their parents will develop healthy self-esteem in them -- and this will automatically overflow into their other relationships. As they value themselves, so shall they value others. 

Renowned Christian pastor and speaker, Josh McDowell, made this equation a buzzword, decades ago (referring to the relationship between parents and children): 

Rules + Relationship = Obedience 

Rules without Relationship = Rebellion 

Simply put, parents should continuously build a healthy, loving relationship with their children so that their children will be obedient to them. A healthy, loving relationship leads to cooperation and obedience. However, if there’s no loving, healthy relationship between parents and children, the children tend to rebel -- blatantly or secretly. 

Loving our children requires TIME. There are no shortcuts. It means intentionally spending time with them; having fun conversations with them; talking to them about God and Christian values; defining the house rules clearly and the consequences for disobeying them; applying discipline and consequences swiftly, fairly, and without favoritism; sharing meals together; learning things together; praying for each other; teaching them to love God and love others; teaching them to admit it, say sorry, and accept the consequences when they’ve done wrong; praising them for their good character MORE than their physical appearance or accomplishments; teaching them when to study and when to play; teaching them that winning FAIRLY is better than just winning; teaching them to share with, and have compassion for others, etc. 

There are many, many more things that we need to teach our children. Don’t be overwhelmed by how much. Instead, focus on what you can teach them today, every time you’re with them. But don’t be preachy -- it’s the fastest way to turn them off. Instead, be interesting, creative, resourceful, pleasant. 

Remember, your lessons are caught more than they’re taught! What our children see us doing leaves a much deeper impression in their minds than what we teach or say. 

The less of a hypocrite we are, the better teachers we become!
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