June 23, 2017, 12:19 am
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.07443 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.4017 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03628 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.32436 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02723 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03626 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04054 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.63579 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03534 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00763 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 34.60377 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02027 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02797 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13904 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06579 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02027 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.30624 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.20692 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 405.75598 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04049 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02733 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01952 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 13.57175 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13799 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 58.59343 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 11.43535 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02027 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.98075 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.47231 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.59951 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13357 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.95278 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.19181 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.28109 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.36583 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.46433 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01797 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04244 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01573 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01572 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08685 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.91021 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 182.75233 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1491 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 4.14512 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15784 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.47422 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13229 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.24625 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 5.54195 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 269.57844 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07211 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.30521 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 23.93595 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 657.62059 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 1.9771 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.6139 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01433 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.23666 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 2.0906 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.38113 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 81.57681 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 9.12404 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 18.24078 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 22.6366 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00614 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01662 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.364 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 166.08836 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 30.51277 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 3.08877 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 1.84435 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25922 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06179 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01258 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02821 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.19642 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.36735 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.09972 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 27.52331 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 48.27726 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16258 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 7.25578 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.70024 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.31394 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 14.54094 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.37863 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08672 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.2604 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.52615 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.59972 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17055 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.08654 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02835 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00779 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02027 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06622 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06654 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.11897 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0753 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 112.82935 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0738 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08196 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.14766 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 16.61897 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.076 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16004 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26836 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13498 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17451 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02797 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01573 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.45006 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 152.00649 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 11.08634 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 435.85326 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17678 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 10.43737 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.26014 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.6897 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04917 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04647 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0711 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13537 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.61011 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 45.17633 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.53223 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 72.78071 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02027 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.57377 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 77.82732 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.20216 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 459.54601 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.18241 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05201 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 11.77483 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05472 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 11.82205 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 2.13174 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 5.06546 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25921 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 105.17835 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 7.33482 Zimbabwe dollar

Taxation in Asean

ECONOMIES in the Association of Southeast Asian Nations need not have uniform tax rates in order to benefit from  integration under the Asean Economic Community (AEC), the country’s chief economist said.

To fully enjoy the benefits of the integration, Asean countries should be competitive in infrastructure, wages, labor efficiency, management efficiency, and costs of production, including taxes, said Gil Beltran, undersecretary of the Department of Finance (DOF) chief economist.

“You don’t need to zero out your taxes to be competitive. There are other production costs aside from taxes,” Beltran  said in an e-mail interview.

Instead, Beltran said,  governments have  to harmonize rules on taxation to avoid friction and overlaps. 

“Cross-border transactions need to be defined clearly and a streamlined process needs to be put in place to ensure that there will be no leakages and overlaps,” Beltran said.

“The costs of complying with tax obligations have to be kept low enough so that the benefits of integration are not eroded,” he added.

Beltran said  with the AEC, which is set to begin at the end of 2015, opportunities for consumers and investors will broaden. 

The envisioned AEC rests on four main pillars: the establishment of a single market and production base; greater competition within the region; equitable development for all; and enhanced integration into the global economy.

“The market will be bigger in size and growth (would be) much faster. There will be more competition but success in the competitive process will be rewarded,” Beltran said.

“It will take some time before the full effect will be felt because there are lags in responses but eventually, the effect will seep in,” he added.

Beltran, however, said  there are several bottlenecks that need to be addressed with the integration of Asean economies.

These are the lack of infrastructure, information, legal constraints, and differences in language and culture. 

“Investors and consumers will need to understand the market fully before they can fully take advantage of opportunities created by integration,” Beltran said.

Finance Secretary Cesar Purisima previously said that in light of efforts to accelerate Asean integration and to boost Philippine competitiveness, the DOF is open  to a change in the tax system, particularly in the income tax structure.

“Lowering income tax rates will attract even more foreign investors into the country but will be detrimental to our fiscal health if they are not offset by revenue-generating measures,” Purisima  said.

“Hence, we remain resolute in our stand that any tax reform pursued must be holistic, revenue-neutral, and equitable so all Filipinos may continue to benefit from a robust fiscal position. This is the mindset that we possess as we engage in discussions with legislators concerning tax reform,” he added.

Purisima said  in light of the upcoming Asean  integration, there is broad agreement on the need for international cooperation and multilateral instruments as strategies to boost tax administration and compliance. 

The Philippines has among the highest effective tax rates in Asean. But tax effort --- tax revenue to GDP ratio – is lower than those of its regional peers, at 13.7 percent in 2013.

“Tax systems must raise revenues to benefit the areas and communities where businesses operate and profit from,” Beltran said.

“Tax policy must therefore not only be simple, progressive, and equitable, it must consider environmental and social justice as key priorities as well,” he added.

For her part, Bureau of Internal Revenue Commissioner Kim Henares said  living in an increasingly globalized world requires governments to adapt and update tax policy and enforcement strategies. 

“International cooperation is key if we want to raise sustainable amounts of revenues to continue funding growth and investments to our people and country,” Henares  said in an earlier interview.

Meanwhile, National Economic and Development Authority director general Arsenio Balisacan earlier said  reforming the tax system and raising tax efforts to levels at par with regional peers is also crucial in sustaining fast-paced growth. 

“Some areas that need further institutional reform include: improving the tax effort among the self-employed and corporations; curbing smuggling; improving the current mining fiscal regime; and rationalizing fiscal incentive,” Balisacan said.

The NEDA chief said  Asean has come a long way to realizing goals especially in the past decade. 

“AEC is all about deeper economic integration with our regional neighbors, in view of even deeper integration for the Borderless Asean Community by 2030,” Balisacan said.

“As early as January 2010, more than 99 percent of tariff lines between Asean-6 Member Countries have been brought down to zero in line with the goals of the Asean Free Trade Area or AFTA. Efforts are underway to hasten the elimination of non-tariff barriers,” he added.

The NEDA chief also noted  that the Asean has forged free trade agreements with key global players, namely China, India, Japan, South Korea, Australia, and New Zealand, to bolster the region’s position in the international stage.

“While several reforms have been instituted in the Philippines putting it in a favorable position to benefit from AEC, many developmental constraints still need to be addressed to maximize our gains from AEC, especially in opening up investments, accelerating infrastructure development, and generating high-quality jobs,” Balisacan said.

The NEDA chief said that while low-hanging fruits are within reach, some policy reforms are “much easier said than done.” 

“In truth, many of these crucial reforms should have been done decades ago, but the AEC 2015 is a welcome deadline highlighting their importance and adding pressure to their urgency,” Balisacan said.
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