June 20, 2018, 3:18 am
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.06897 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.04526 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03404 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.52113 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02544 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03343 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03756 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.57728 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03184 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00709 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 32.88225 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01878 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02522 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12883 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07009 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01878 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.277 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.19573 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 375.96244 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03752 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02494 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01868 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 12.01146 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12169 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 54.86948 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 10.59718 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01878 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.78854 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.41869 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.33333 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12088 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.93052 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.20053 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25367 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33502 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.51117 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01621 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03897 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01426 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01425 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08833 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.87962 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 169.05164 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14052 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 3.88526 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14739 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.44866 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1197 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.23812 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 5.22103 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 261.46479 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06819 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.27817 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 22.23474 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 796.99531 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 2.05333 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.4507 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01331 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.06607 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 1.89577 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.28255 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 75.84601 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 7.92488 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 16.90141 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 20.8492 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00568 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0154 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.40488 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 157.33333 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 28.26291 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 3.00282 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 2.66254 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.2584 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05725 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01165 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02546 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17921 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.31576 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.99324 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 25.69014 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 45.33333 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15181 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 6.66667 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.65765 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.29239 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 13.39812 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.3853 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07515 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25797 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.74178 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.59151 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15379 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.0385 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0272 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00723 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01878 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06164 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06142 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.28545 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06993 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 106.70047 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06835 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07565 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.1966 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 15.95174 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07042 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14841 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25277 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33719 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16718 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02548 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01426 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.41701 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 149.29577 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 10.57277 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 397.4216 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16432 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 9.67099 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25817 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.61446 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04845 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04326 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08905 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12487 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.56648 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 42.59155 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.49596 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 72.33803 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01878 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.59211 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 147.69953 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 1498.59155 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 429.12676 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.02911 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04869 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 10.62592 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0507 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 10.62592 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 1.92432 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.69202 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25823 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 97.4554 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 6.79624 Zimbabwe dollar

PH CEOs pessimistic over tax environment

Business executives in the Philippines along with Myanmar are among  the most pessimistic about the domestic tax environment, findings of the  Business Barometer: OBG in Asean CEO Survey show.

The highlights of the survey, contained in OBG’s Editors’ Blog, did not discuss this finding in detail but the survey was done in 2017 just  as the Philippines was about to implement its tax reforms.

Philippine executives join five Asean members optimistic of business prospects.

 Around 84 percent of executives surveyed across six Asean  states – Indonesia, Malaysia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Thailand and Vietnam – had positive or very positive expectations for local business conditions in the coming 12 months, while 72 percent were likely or very likely to make a significant capital investment

 The survey covered  over 550 C-suite executives from Indonesia, Malaysia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Thailand and Vietnam a wide-ranging series of questions in face-to-face meetings. Significantly, by collating a collective sample, the team was able to gauge and analyse regional investor confidence, while also noting varying national perceptions within the bloc.

 The largest national sample came from Indonesia, followed by the Philippines, Myanmar and Thailand, while the smallest samples were taken from Vietnam and Malaysia. 
 
From the business leaders interviewed, 72 percent told OBG that they were likely or very likely to make a significant capital investment within the next 12 months. 

An even higher share (around 84 percent) of executives surveyed across the six Asean states had positive or very positive expectations for local business conditions over the same timeframe.

 In a sign of the key role played by the private sector in generating growth across the bloc, three-quarters of respondents said that government spending accounted for less than 40 percent of business in their respective sectors.

 OBG’s findings also confirmed the influence that China continues to exert on the Asean markets, with the highest proportion of respondents (33 percent) citing a slowdown in the Asian giant’s economy as the external factor they believed would have the greatest impact on short-to-medium-term domestic growth. 

Trade between China and Asean reached a record level of $514.8 billion  in 2017, according to official Chinese figures. China also tops the list of trading partners for all six countries represented in OBG’s survey.
 
A similar share (31 percent) cited leadership as the attribute most in need across the workforce in their respective markets, followed by engineering (28 percent), and research and development (15 percent), highlighting skills gaps across the region that could hinder competitiveness if left unaddressed.
 
When it came to transparency, the picture was varied. Almost half (47 percent) of business leaders interviewed described transparency in their market as high or very high relative to the region, while a similar share (41 percent) said it was low or very low. 

Responses were similar to a question about tax competitiveness, with half of the respondents referring to their country’s tax environment as either uncompetitive or very uncompetitive on a global scale, while 41 percent said it was competitive or very competitive.
 
Executives from Vietnam and Myanmar were most negative about business transparency levels, with CEOs from the latter also among the most pessimistic about the domestic tax environment, alongside executives from the Philippines. 

CEOs from Vietnam, together with others in Malaysia and Thailand, were more positive about their respective tax environments.
 
 Patrick Cooke, OBG’s regional editor for Asia, said the strong business sentiment and high expectations documented in the inaugural OBG in Asean CEO Survey were in line with the region’s current position as the leading engine of global economic expansion.

 Cooke,  however, noted  external risks could derail Asean’s momentum, particularly as the world’s two biggest economies continue to impose anti-trade measures on one another, whilst China’s growth is expected to moderate somewhat as it focuses on de-risking its financial sector and rebalancing its economy towards consumption-led expansion.

 Cooke said survey questions on tax, credit access and transparency inevitably produced mixed responses, reflecting the varying stages of development and economic priorities of the markets surveyed.
 
“Perhaps what this mixed picture of the business environment demonstrates above all else is that despite ongoing efforts towards the harmonization of certain laws, standards, regulations and practices across the bloc, significant development disparities and competing fiscal regimes remain obstacles to the smooth integration of the Asean Economic Community , which by 2025 aims to create a cohesive single market and production base that promotes ‘shared prosperity’ among all members,” he said.
 
He added that if the AEC is to succeed in its ambition of creating “a people-centered, outward-looking bloc that is highly integrated in international value chains”, member states will need to make education and skills development a priority, “as the region looks to cultivate a new generation of innovators that can translate ideas into sustainable wealth and job generation against a backdrop of intense global competition and rapid technological change, which will give birth to new industries while sounding the death knell for others.”
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