June 18, 2018, 11:12 pm
Facebook iconTwitter iconYouTube iconGoogle+ icon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06887 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.01763 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03375 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.52595 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02519 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03338 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0375 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.56891 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03163 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00708 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 32.83293 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01875 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02508 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12845 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06994 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01875 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.26852 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.19282 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 375.39846 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03746 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02475 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0187 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 11.85955 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12072 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 54.23964 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 10.57585 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01875 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.78136 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.41526 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.32833 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1203 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.92481 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.19301 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25282 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33377 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.51078 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01616 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03862 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01411 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01411 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08774 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.8783 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 168.7418 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.13756 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 3.86799 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14715 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.44823 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.11904 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.22745 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 5.20533 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 261.11007 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06788 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.27862 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 22.20139 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 793.5496 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 2.01763 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.42115 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01329 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.07454 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 1.89293 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.28161 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 75.86537 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 7.83274 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 16.87605 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 20.66229 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00567 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01538 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.31164 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 157.15357 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 28.23364 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 2.99081 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 2.62835 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.2522 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05717 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01164 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02542 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.17853 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.31382 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.9715 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 25.27658 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 45.11532 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15157 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 6.65667 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.65479 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.29196 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 13.37802 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.38672 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0747 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.2516 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.71292 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.58522 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15276 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.03846 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02698 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00722 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01875 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06144 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05887 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.23233 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06922 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 105.94412 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06825 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07529 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.18378 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 15.92781 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07032 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1483 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25162 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33668 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16475 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02532 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01412 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.41639 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 148.88431 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 10.53816 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 395.79974 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16407 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 9.65648 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25162 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.61204 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04892 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04288 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08861 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12572 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.56497 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 42.52766 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.49372 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 71.94825 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01875 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.59066 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 148.13426 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 1496.34352 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 427.78924 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.02025 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04811 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 10.58541 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05063 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 10.58541 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 1.91656 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.68498 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25181 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 97.30921 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 6.78605 Zimbabwe dollar

Interventions readied as Boracay closure looms

The Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) will seek P300 million out of the P2.3 billion  allotted for the rehabilitation of Boracay for various interventions to assist businesses displaced by the six-month closure of Boracay starting Thursday.

The private sector meanwhile has made available 4,000 wide ranging jobs for those who will be displaced with the closure of Boracay.

Lopez told reporters P100 million is needed for straight loans for alternative livelihood for the entrepreneurs of which P50 million will be the first tranche.

The rest of the funds

According to Lopez, there are some 430 companies engaged in gifts and souvenirs which the DTI will assist either by helping them to relocate their businesses to other tourists spots; sell their products in malls or even change business altogether. 

The loans will be interest free for two years. 

Lopez hopes the first batch of loans would be approved in a month. 
 
Beyond Boracay

One Boracay composed of the Tourism Congress of the Philippines (TCP), Philippine Travel Agencies Association (PTAA) and the Hotel Sales and Marketing Association (HSMA) as key members along with local tourism stakeholders in Boracay, is also set to expand its advocacy of preserving the island to include some of the other prime tourism destinations in the country.

“There will be groups like the one we have for Boracay in other destinations that are under intense scrutiny or those that are being threatened to be closed by the government.  We have One Boracay now.  There will be One Bohol, One Puerto Galera, and One Palawan very soon,”

TCP president Jose Clemente III said while adding that all tourism stakeholders in the country are now more united than before.

PTAA president Marlene Dado Jante said they will exert efforts to avoid having other destinations suffer the same fate as Boracay.

“We want the government, in the future, to first consult with all stakeholders and incorporate our ideas before executing any actions that will affect tourism destinations and the industry itself on multiple levels.  The government should understand that we are the ones on the ground and that we have a clear understanding on how the industry works,” Jante said.

Both Clemente and Jante said that had government given more time before shutting down Boracay, all stakeholders would have been better prepared during its six month closure.

One Boracay does not want a repeat of the current high state of confusion in Boracay because of the haste at which the government wants to implement the closure of the island.

The TCP, created under Republic Act 9593 or more commonly known as the Tourism Act of 2009, is mandated to act as the private sector consultative body to assist the government in the development, implementation, and coordination of Philippine tourism policy.

The PTAA is the biggest grouping of tourism stakeholders in the country and has been a leading partner of the government in the promotion and development of Philippine tourism while the HSMA seeks to advance sustainable revenue growth for the hotels and resorts industry and contribute to the robust growth of Philippine tourism.
 
Jobs available 

Meanwhile, One Boracay is offering 4,000 jobs to those who will be displaced with the closure of the island.

The job openings are spread across key cities across the country including Metro Manila, Bohol, and Palawan.

Additionally, according to Jante, they will also request their more than 600 members nationwide to offer at least two job openings, even temporary, to those who will become unemployed due to Boracay’s closure.

“This will be on top, on what we, as One Boracay is offering.  We want those workers to remain gainfully employed and capable of providing for their families until Boracay reopens,” Jante said.

Next month, members of One Boracay will meet to map out a marketing plan for the reopening of Boracay including multiple promos for November onwards.
 
Force majeure

Sherwin Gatchalian, Senate committee on energy chairman,  has urged the Aklan Electric Cooperative, Inc. (AKELCO) to invoke force majeure to avoid passing on extra power charges to its consumers during the impending six-month closure of Boracay Island.

 “The closure of restaurants, resorts, and other commercial establishments on Boracay Island during the effectivity of the closure order will not only result in the loss of jobs. It will also drive down the demand for electricity in AKELCO’s franchise area, as these commercial establishments account for 41 percent of the electric coop’s power demand,” Gatchalian said  in a statement.

 From a high of 28 megawatts (MW), Boracay’s energy demand will drop to as low as 4 MW during the closure period.
Category: 
Rating: 
No votes yet

Column of the Day

The man who could have been king

Jose Bayani Baylon's picture
By JOSE BAYANI BAYLON | June 18,2018
‘(T)hat’s why Villar lost. He lost to the memory of Cory.’

Opinion of the Day

Protecting your accounts

Dahli Aspillera's picture
By DAHLI ASPILLERA | June 18, 2018
‘All the horror stories about fraud that’s committed on us when they steal name, address, SSS number, credit cards.’