June 25, 2018, 5:49 am
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1 Philippine Peso = 0.06901 UAE Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 2.02912 Albanian Lek
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03401 Neth Antilles Guilder
1 Philippine Peso = 0.5072 Argentine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02524 Australian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03345 Aruba Florin
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03758 Barbados Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.57159 Bangladesh Taka
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03155 Bulgarian Lev
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00712 Bahraini Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 32.90079 Burundi Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01879 Bermuda Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02526 Brunei Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1289 Bolivian Boliviano
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07111 Brazilian Real
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01879 Bahamian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 1.28053 Bhutan Ngultrum
1 Philippine Peso = 0.19402 Botswana Pula
1 Philippine Peso = 376.17437 Belarus Ruble
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03754 Belize Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02493 Canadian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01856 Swiss Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 11.99061 Chilean Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12218 Chinese Yuan
1 Philippine Peso = 54.75385 Colombian Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 10.57591 Costa Rica Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01879 Cuban Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 1.77772 Cape Verde Escudo
1 Philippine Peso = 0.41526 Czech Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 3.33615 Djibouti Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12016 Danish Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 0.92728 Dominican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.1963 Algerian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25225 Estonian Kroon
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33484 Egyptian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.51146 Ethiopian Birr
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01612 Euro
1 Philippine Peso = 0.03918 Fiji Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01416 Falkland Islands Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01417 British Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08979 Ghanaian Cedi
1 Philippine Peso = 0.87956 Gambian Dalasi
1 Philippine Peso = 169.07178 Guinea Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14072 Guatemala Quetzal
1 Philippine Peso = 3.87599 Guyana Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.14741 Hong Kong Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.44878 Honduras Lempira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.11882 Croatian Kuna
1 Philippine Peso = 1.24803 Haiti Gourde
1 Philippine Peso = 5.23224 Hungarian Forint
1 Philippine Peso = 264.43067 Indonesian Rupiah
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06764 Israeli Shekel
1 Philippine Peso = 1.27568 Indian Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 22.24728 Iraqi Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 798.38407 Iran Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 2.03119 Iceland Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 2.45509 Jamaican Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01333 Jordanian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 2.06417 Japanese Yen
1 Philippine Peso = 1.89121 Kenyan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 1.28183 Kyrgyzstan Som
1 Philippine Peso = 76.00526 Cambodia Riel
1 Philippine Peso = 7.92522 Comoros Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 16.91094 North Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 20.86622 Korean Won
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00568 Kuwaiti Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01541 Cayman Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.38595 Kazakhstan Tenge
1 Philippine Peso = 158.00451 Lao Kip
1 Philippine Peso = 28.292 Lebanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 2.98572 Sri Lanka Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 2.74709 Liberian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25254 Lesotho Loti
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05728 Lithuanian Lita
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01166 Latvian Lat
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02548 Libyan Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1786 Moroccan Dirham
1 Philippine Peso = 0.3177 Moldovan Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.98891 Macedonian Denar
1 Philippine Peso = 25.98647 Myanmar Kyat
1 Philippine Peso = 45.97896 Mongolian Tugrik
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15183 Macau Pataca
1 Philippine Peso = 6.67042 Mauritania Ougulya
1 Philippine Peso = 0.65295 Mauritius Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.29256 Maldives Rufiyaa
1 Philippine Peso = 13.4053 Malawi Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 0.37584 Mexican Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07518 Malaysian Ringgit
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25239 Namibian Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 6.72679 Nigerian Naira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.59207 Nicaragua Cordoba
1 Philippine Peso = 0.15205 Norwegian Krone
1 Philippine Peso = 2.03401 Nepalese Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02719 New Zealand Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.00723 Omani Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01879 Panama Balboa
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06134 Peruvian Nuevo Sol
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0609 Papua New Guinea Kina
1 Philippine Peso = 1 Philippine Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 2.28222 Pakistani Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06966 Polish Zloty
1 Philippine Peso = 106.55769 Paraguayan Guarani
1 Philippine Peso = 0.06839 Qatar Rial
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07509 Romanian New Leu
1 Philippine Peso = 1.18236 Russian Rouble
1 Philippine Peso = 15.96073 Rwanda Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 0.07046 Saudi Arabian Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.1479 Solomon Islands Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25235 Seychelles Rupee
1 Philippine Peso = 0.33738 Sudanese Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16635 Swedish Krona
1 Philippine Peso = 0.02551 Singapore Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01417 St Helena Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.41725 Slovak Koruna
1 Philippine Peso = 149.94363 Sierra Leone Leone
1 Philippine Peso = 10.72905 Somali Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 394.98309 Sao Tome Dobra
1 Philippine Peso = 0.16441 El Salvador Colon
1 Philippine Peso = 9.67644 Syrian Pound
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25202 Swaziland Lilageni
1 Philippine Peso = 0.61856 Thai Baht
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04882 Tunisian Dinar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.04333 Tongan paʻanga
1 Philippine Peso = 0.08786 Turkish Lira
1 Philippine Peso = 0.12682 Trinidad Tobago Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.56924 Taiwan Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 42.63435 Tanzanian Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.49267 Ukraine Hryvnia
1 Philippine Peso = 72.51597 Ugandan Shilling
1 Philippine Peso = 0.01879 United States Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 0.59451 Uruguayan New Peso
1 Philippine Peso = 147.50094 Uzbekistan Sum
1 Philippine Peso = 1499.4363 Venezuelan Bolivar
1 Philippine Peso = 430.10147 Vietnam Dong
1 Philippine Peso = 2.07159 Vanuatu Vatu
1 Philippine Peso = 0.0488 Samoa Tala
1 Philippine Peso = 10.56614 CFA Franc (BEAC)
1 Philippine Peso = 0.05073 East Caribbean Dollar
1 Philippine Peso = 10.56614 CFA Franc (BCEAO)
1 Philippine Peso = 1.92165 Pacific Franc
1 Philippine Peso = 4.69466 Yemen Riyal
1 Philippine Peso = 0.25241 South African Rand
1 Philippine Peso = 97.51033 Zambian Kwacha
1 Philippine Peso = 6.80008 Zimbabwe dollar

A home run by a family

BY STANLEY CRIS LARAÑO

“Kahit ano pwede,” I remember telling the guard on duty at the Malaya office on West Avenue when he asked me what job I was applying for. I was close to earning a Political Science degree so I have to immediately find a job, related or not to my undergraduate course.

Luckily, Malaya allowed me to join its proofreading section. On probation, of course. I will be evaluated for three months and be offered a permanent position if I make the grade.

This was 1987, just after the EDSA People Power Revolution that was well documented by Malaya. Computers had yet to make their way to the Malaya newsroom while the e-mail and the Internet were just figments of scientists’ imagination, if at all. 

The sound of a Remington typewriter always filled the still empty editorial floor when Irma Isip catches a story dictated by provincial correspondent, with the receiver of a black rotary phone sandwiched between her shoulder and ear. 

The late Lina Monroy will edit the copy and literally cut the paper where a paragraph is on, and insert and paste (staple, really) it where appropriate.

Then it would be forwarded to Tess Molina, our gatekeeper, who logs a story before it was sent to the IBM section. 

Nelson Dalisay, head of the section who could probably type more than 120 words a minute even as he gossips with us, would pound away on an IBM typesetting machine and give us the printout so we could check if it is faithful to the edited copy.

Typeset copies were deposited with Tess, who forwarded them to the Paste Up section when the page editor completed the lay out on the dummy sheet. The font size of the headline, the font style and the column and inches a story will take up are predetermined so the layout artist could work efficiently. 

Only a few, if any, newsroom had computers then; fax machines were also rare. Everything was done manually. 

A layout artist’s main tools were his cutter and   scotch tape. The paste up section is the domain of the male species and that is why Ritz Silvino was an oddity. And that didn’t escape two of our veteran reporters who will remain unnamed here. 

Cameramen--those who take photos of a page to produce a negative used in the printing press--were always on the case of the paste up artists, proofreaders, and editors. 

“Deadline na. Hindi na tayo aabot sa probinsya,” I remember the head of the camera section--whose name escapes me--would always tell us. Missing a printing deadline means we’ll lose a major chunk of our circulation. The Malaya edition--provincial, city or remat--were determined by the stars on the masthead.

Malaya was more than a place of work. It was “home” run by a “family.” 

The library in our office in Timog turned to a nursery for my first born, with one of our librarians Susan Ferwelo, her part time nanny, allowing me to do my job. 

Malaya allowed everyone who wanted to, to grow. We were allowed to typeset stories, help in paste up, even develop black and white photos. Thank you Linglong Ortiz and Mon Acasio. 

From proofreading, several of us got a break in writing through the various sections of Malaya. Abac Cordero, Didi Doloricon and Rowena Burgos were all one-time Malaya proofreaders.

Our editor then, Luis “Moric” Mauricio, often had a note for the proofreading section, noting errors in the day’s edition. Everyone dreaded being called upstairs, to Moric’s office. Our errors were fodder for his column underwritten under a pseudonym on mistakes in various publications. 

They were instructive, his notes and column were. He’d tell us that “don’t allow a hanging preposition in a headline” or “your are charged with, rapped for, and accused of.”

It was Winnie Velasquez who allowed me to move to editorial after she agreed to hire me as her assistant in Malaya’s features section, Living. She was kind enough to let me move to general news when slots opened following an exodus of reporters including Ben Evardone, Butch Fernandez, and Benjie Guevarra. 

Yvonne Chua, now with Vera Files, directed my news coverage, taking the time like a generous college professor to guide a student falling behind. Reporters often go to office then and those were opportunities for learning.

I got into business reporting accidentally. I left Malaya briefly and when I came back, there was no more slot in general news. 

Ma’m Yvonne said a slot might open in a couple of months but if I’m in a hurry to work I could write for Ma’m Yeng Galang, editor of the business section, our late publisher Jake Macasaet’s favorite section. 

“Yeng kailangan mo ba ng reporter? Meron dito, kaso di sanay sa business reporting (a major understatement),” Ma’m Yvonne hollered. Ma’m Yeng, who only had Vic Lopez and Lou Palpalatoc Tangi in her reporting staff, replied: “Basta marunong magsulat. Ayos na yan.”

Turns out business reporting would eventually lead me to Dow Jones Newswires, which would employ me for over 22 years until early 2017.

Many things have changed since I left Malaya in 1994. For one, it is now called Business Insight--the title of the column Jake used to write. 

Many others have also gone to the great beyond. My kumpare Rodel Agoncillo, husband to Irma; Andy Valle, one of our photographers; editor Isagani Yambot; night reporter Jimmy Perez; and managing editor Joy de los Reyes. Malaya has also move offices several times since my departure.

But many familiar faces are still there. 

Sir Pocholo Romualdez,  he who gave basketball great Caloy Loyzaga the monicker “The Big Difference”; the indefatigable Ellen Tordesillas; and of course jack-of-all-trades Che Francisco. 

It still feels like home.

Happy 35th anniversary Malaya Business Insights. Thank you for the break you gave in the industry.
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